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SCREEN WRITING CLASS - MOD 2


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#1 aroundworld

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Posted 25 August 2012 - 04:20 PM

Audience Expectation


For continuity we will be using the classical Three Act Structure for study purposes.

In this module we'll be discussing:

The Three act structure and how it is designed to setup audience expectation


Plant and Pay off; How elements (guns, knives, clothes, words, characters...etc) are planted in story and re-introduced later to provide a dramatic pay off or aid in keeping the story cohesive.


As we saw in Module 1, Routine and Interruption, the audience is setup to EXPECT SOMETHING TO HAPPEN. As the character experiences an interruption to their routine (daily life, normal world...etc) the audience will ask the question:

WHAT HAPPENS NEXT?


The preceding module to this topic: Interruption of Routine, can be found here:
http://www.moviestor...p...c=13153&hl=




SYLLABIS FOR CLASS MODULES


MODULE 1


Understand the concept of routine and interruption.

MODULE 2

Understand and use the concept of plant and payoff.

Combining Routine and Interruption with Plant and Payoff

MODULE 3

Identify and avoid the most common flaws when developing a story. Utilize the payoff by mining material that has been introduced into the story.

Practice the art of visual storytelling.

Assignments:

1. Assignment Outline for a Visual Movie Opening

Discussion:

1. When you think of great visual filmmakers, who comes to mind and why?



MODULE 4


Understand the concept of the central question.

Assignments:

Central Question exercise: (What is the single most important goal of the protagonist and will he/she achieve it?)


MODULE 5

Understand the different movie Genres and the concept of Genre.

Explore the art of adapting a story for a movie.

What are the benefits of adaptation?


Assignments:

Assignment: Adaptation Assignment

Discussion:
Talk about a movie that you liked which was adapted from a book that you have read. What was similar to the book? What was different?



Module 6

Troubleshooting a Story

Troubleshoot a story.

Critically evaluate a story’s obstacles. Reconsider the central question. Brainstorm for obstacles.

Assignments:

Assignment Obstacle Brainstorm

Discussion:
1. Provide an example of a creative solution to obstacles faced by a character in a recent movie that you've seen.


Module 7

The Hook, Through-Line and Place Markers

Student Outcomes:

Understand the importance of the hook when telling a story.

Use a through-line in a narrative.

Understand what a cute meet is in screenwriting.

Utilize place markers when writing.

Assignments:

1. Discussion Exercise: Cute Meet
2. Assignment: Place Marker Sketch

Discussion:
1. Talk about any issues or problems you have had with identifying Through-Lines or using Place Markers.



Module 8

Defining Characters

Student Outcomes:

Understand the pleasure and necessity of researching material for stories.

Learn about the importance of story drivers.

Explore how characters can be defined by their reactions.

Address the issue of moral choices that characters make.

Assignments:

1. Assignment: Distinct Reactions


Discussion:

Describe an example of a moral choice made by a character in a movie you've seen.




Module 9

The Message

Understand how a message can drive what the characters do.

Understand the importance of the message in a movie.

Utilize a message that can lead to a premise.

Assignments:

Messages Assignment: Define what the message of your story is.

Discussion:

Discuss the last message you saw in a feature film. Did it resonate effectively?


Module 10:

Developing Characters

Understand what goes into creating a memorable character.

Utilize different methods to sketch out a character.

Understand the importance of the character arc.

Assignments:

Write a Fictitious Character Profile

Discussion:
List a couple of examples of character arcs from films you've seen recently.




Module 11

Story Endings


Identify the different types of endings for movies, including open- ended story and the story with a surprise ending.

Understand that loose ends are usually tied up in a good ending.

Write an opening scene and an ending scene for a movie.

Assignments:

Opening Scene and Ending scene for a movie

Post a story ending that did not work in a movie that you've seen recently. Explain why you feel it didn't work.


Module 12

Character Voices


Understand some of the factors that influence a character’s voice.

Write in the voice of an invented character.

Understand the benefit to the screenwriter of having a broad base of knowledge.

Assignments:

1. Character Voice Monologue: Write a small scene were your character expresses an emotion or opinion…etc

2. Talk about one of your favorite movie characters with a unique and distinctive voice. What is it about the character and their voice that you like?



Module 13

Supporting and Main Characters
Writing Log-lines and Synopsys for your story

Understand what goes into creating a complete story

Know how to formulate a pitch for a story for film Comprehend the use and importance of supporting characters.

Assignments:

Assignment: The Pitch Assignment; writing Log-line and synopsis

Discussion:
Discuss the most challenging aspects of putting together your pitch assignment.


Module 14

Gathering Information for Your Story


Know how to gather and research material for writing a screenplay.

Explore use of the Internet for research.

Look at mimicking a character’s lifestyle and locale.

Understand the value of nurturing relationships for information and professional connections.

Understand the advantage of reading and relevant research.

Assignments:

The Pitch Assignment: Review your classmate's submissions from
Module 13 and share feedback with the class.

Discussion:
1. After reviewing your classmate's pitches, how would you change the presentation of your pitch? What about their work inspired you to make changes?



Module 15: Conclusion:

Subplots and Naming Your Film

Define different kinds of subplots, including romantic interests, inner demons and problems with family and friends.

Understand how to name a film and some of the sources for film titles.

Assignments:

No assignments in this module

Discussion:

Describe one of your favorite subplots from a film you've recently seen. Did it support the main plot line?







There is no try, only do or do not.

 

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START HERE:  http://www.moviestor...showtopic=13153


#2 aroundworld

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Posted 25 August 2012 - 05:38 PM

Plant and Payoff




Plant and Payoff is a visual plot device that AROUSES and SATISFIES CURIOSITY OF THE AUDIENCE and moves your story forward in rising conflict.

The Plant Arouses audience curiosity

The Payoff Satisfies Audience curiosity


We show the audience something; obvious examples would be a gun, knife, sword...etc. that fits in the sceneor seems right for the character to poses. That same element (usually in the same scene or very next scene) is used to by our hero or villain to:


Defend themselves, try to kill the good guy/bad guy

If it's a letter or piece of information; steal it, read it,

BUT! the audience MUST SEE IT and KNOW WHAT IT IS in order to UNDERSTAND it's SIGNIFICANCE!


In routine and interruption we saw the clip Three days of the Condor .

In this scene, is a plant and payoff. As the secretary opens the drawer to buzz Redford in the office we see a GUN (PLANT) in her drawer.

Later, when Redford returns from getting lunch and finds all his co-workers dead he gets the gun (PAYOFF) from the drawer.

Please watch that clip again. Look for the gun.

James Bond's gadgets are simple examples of PLANT and PAYOFF. The gadget is introduced, we're SHOWN what it is, what it does, and now we're wondering WHEN IS HE GOING TO USE IT? The EXPECTATION.


SIMPLE ASSIGNMENT

Write three examples of PLANT and PAYOFF in movies that you've seen. Post them here, and we'll discuss them.



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#3 squirrelygirl

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Posted 26 August 2012 - 02:51 AM

Hopefully I'm on the right track:

Matilda: There"s a scene where her father is showing her and her brother how he "fixes" the cars he sells, but just enough to make them look or run well for a short time. Instead of welding a bumper he glues it on. She argues that what he is doing is illegal and he tells her that he's right and she's wrong. She looks to her right and we see his hat sitting next to the glue. Later when he tries to remove his hat it won't come off because it's glued to his head.

A Knight's Tale: Adhemar (the bad guy) holds a tipped lance. In the next scene he is jousting against Will (the good guy). When his lance strikes Will the tip penetrates Will's armor and breaks off.

Misery: Paul gets out of his room, finds the pain killers Annie has been giving him since his car accident, and takes some. In a later scene he add the powder inside the pills to Annie's drink.

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#4 aroundworld

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Posted 26 August 2012 - 07:30 AM

QUOTE (squirrelygirl @ Aug 26 2012, 02:51 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Hopefully I'm on the right track:

Matilda: There"s a scene where her father is showing her and her brother how he "fixes" the cars he sells, but just enough to make them look or run well for a short time. Instead of welding a bumper he glues it on. She argues that what he is doing is illegal and he tells her that he's right and she's wrong. She looks to her right and we see his hat sitting next to the glue. Later when he tries to remove his hat it won't come off because it's glued to his head.

Yep! When the audience saw the glue and the hat sitting together (PLANT), they knew something was up and they weren't disappointed. The audience was rewarded with her gluing the hat to his head. Very funny! COMEDIC SUSPENSE! smile.gif

A Knight's Tale: Adhemar (the bad guy) holds a tipped lance. In the next scene he is jousting against Will (the good guy). When his lance strikes Will the tip penetrates Will's armor and breaks off.

This plant and payoff had a very different feel to it. It set the audience up with a feeling of dread instead of a light hearted expectation as we saw in the glue PLANT/PAYOFF. Still, the tipped lance (PLANT) was used (PAYOFF) AS EXPECTED! It satisfied a waiting audience.

Misery: Paul gets out of his room, finds the pain killers Annie has been giving him since his car accident, and takes some. In a later scene he add the powder inside the pills to Annie's drink.

This is a great example because it has the element of suspense attached to it at a very critical time in the story. James Cahn has a real shot at getting away from his captor. When the audience sees he gets to the pain killers (PLANT) they're already thinking, "give some to that crazy so and so, and get the hell out of there!" Of course he fails and that built audience reaction to the PAYOFF as he tries to OD her with the pills and get away.

What's different about the above scenario? The PLANT and PAYOFF was timed by the writer to work as part of a huge risk for our character. When it fails, we're disappointed. BUT! The PLANT and PAYOFF device kept us "glude" to the film.



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#5 JosephKw

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Posted 26 August 2012 - 01:38 PM

Here's my three examples of PLANT and PAYOFF. Incidentally, I am providing three disparate examples in the hopes that they're all correct, but am eager to know what your final verdict is...

JAWS: The PLANT is when our three major protagonists are onboard the Orca, hunting for Bruce the shark. Chief Brody (Schneider) unties a knot which loosens one of Hooper's (Dreyfuss) oxygen tanks. Hoopers yells at Brody to be careful, and that they're full of oxygen and might blow up.
The PAYOFF is when Brody is alone on the sinking Orca. The shark bursts through a window, and Brody hits the thing on the nose with one of the oxygen tanks, then throws it into it's mouth. When it comes back with the tank in its mouth, Brody shoots it with a rifle which blows the whole shark up.
In this example, even though the tank is shown to the audience, it is required that Hooper informs the viewer what it is, and that it is volatile (since most people may not realize what is exactly in those tanks without the verbal exposition).

STAR WARS IV: The PLANT is when Obi-Wan Kenobi hands Luke some sort of handle, and explains it is a light saber, weapon of a Jedi Knight. The PAYOFF is when our heroes are in the Mos Eisley cantina and Luke is accosted by a hostile bar patron, which forces Obi-Wan to ignite his own lightsaber and dismember a few aliens.
In this example, even though the item planted is Luke's own lightsaber, it sets up the payoff when Obi-wan takes out his own lightsaber in combat. It still works even though the object planted (Luke's saber) is not the same one as in the payoff (Obi-Wan's saber).

THE LIVING DAYLIGHTS (First Bond Film with Timothy Dalton). The PLANT is when a car drives onto an airplane and a huge metal plate pops up from the floor to hold the vehicle in place. The PAYOFF is when the plane is about to slide off a cliff, and Bond (and his Bond girl, Olivia D'Abo), jumps into the car, and releases the metal plate so that they can drive off the plane and onto the mesa top before the plane continues its course off the mesa cliff.
In this example, it's simply a mechanical device which all planes which carry cars have (or so I presume). It's just needed to show the audience how a car can be kept in place, and why that plate needed to be removed before the car can be mobile again.

Looking forward to seeing if any or all of these examples can still be considered a proper PLANT and PAYOFF.

#6 kkffoo

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Posted 26 August 2012 - 03:27 PM

Not sure if I am the right track here, so just one example for the moment.

http://en.wikipedia....i/Basil_the_Rat

Fawlty Towers

"Fawlty Towers is in threat of closure by a Health and Safety inspector. After discovering that Manuel is keeping a pet rat, Basil insists that it be removed, but it escapes back into the hotel as the inspector returns."

Multiple plants: We find out Manuel has a pet, the pet escapes, we meet the health inspector, both rat and health inspector are in the dining room.
Payoff: The health inspector sees the rat when the lid is removed from the cracker tin.

It feels as if the scene is so funny because of the multiple threads which weave together to the conclusion...the situation turns and turns about and the audience expectation is raised, and played with, and the inspector is very close to seeing the rat, but does not...will they get away with it?



#7 aroundworld

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Posted 26 August 2012 - 03:41 PM

QUOTE (JosephKw @ Aug 26 2012, 01:38 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Here's my three examples of PLANT and PAYOFF. Incidentally, I am providing three disparate examples in the hopes that they're all correct, but am eager to know what your final verdict is...

JAWS: The PLANT is when our three major protagonists are onboard the Orca, hunting for Bruce the sharkLOL!. Chief Brody (Schneider) unties a knot which loosens one of Hooper's (Dreyfuss) oxygen tanks. Hoopers yells at Brody to be careful, and that they're full of oxygen and might blow up.

Above is a great example of CLEARLY DEFINING what the object (PLANT) is and attaching danger to it! "be careful, and that they're full of oxygen and might blow up."

This is great! When the audience realizes those tanks are dangerous, it raises suspense / EXPECTATION.

On the other hand, if they were only left to clank around it would have shown Brody as a klutz and there would have been no SET UP of AUDIENCE EXPECTATION/SUSPENSE. When are those tanks gonna blow?

When the audience is left without a question or EXPECTATION OF USE (PLANT), the effect is diminished when the PAYOFF comes.

WHY?

As I said above, because there's no question; "When are the tanks gonna blow?" Get the audience to ask themselves the question:

WHEN IS HE/SHE GOING TO USE THAT?








The PAYOFF is when Brody is alone on the sinking Orca. The shark bursts through a window, and Brody hits the thing on the nose with one of the oxygen tanks, then throws it into it's mouth. When it comes back with the tank in its mouth, Brody shoots it with a rifle which blows the whole shark up.
In this example, even though the tank is shown to the audience, it is required that Hooper informs the viewer what it is, and that it is volatile (since most people may not realize what is exactly in those tanks without the verbal exposition).

STAR WARS IV: The PLANT is when Obi-Wan Kenobi hands Luke some sort of handle, and explains it is a light saber, weapon of a Jedi Knight. The PAYOFF is when our heroes are in the Mos Eisley cantina and Luke is accosted by a hostile bar patron, which forces Obi-Wan to ignite his own lightsaber and dismember a few aliens.
In this example, even though the item planted is Luke's own lightsaber, it sets up the payoff when Obi-wan takes out his own lightsaber in combat. It still works even though the object planted (Luke's saber) is not the same one as in the payoff (Obi-Wan's saber).

I remember this scene clearly. One of the reasons this PLANT/PAYOFF worked so well is because no one had ever seen a Light Saber before!

We knew what it was; we were given a CLEAR EXPLANATION. BUT! we still hadn't seen it in action (PAYOFF).

So Again, it left the audience with an EXPECTATION. And the expectation is satisfied at a key moment in the film.


I'm repeating myself because this concept is key in making films people want to watch.



THE LIVING DAYLIGHTS (First Bond Film with Timothy Dalton). The PLANT is when a car drives onto an airplane and a huge metal plate pops up from the floor to hold the vehicle in place. The PAYOFF is when the plane is about to slide off a cliff, and Bond (and his Bond girl, Olivia D'Abo), jumps into the car, and releases the metal plate so that they can drive off the plane and onto the mesa top before the plane continues its course off the mesa cliff.
In this example, it's simply a mechanical device which all planes which carry cars have (or so I presume). It's just needed to show the audience how a car can be kept in place, and why that plate needed to be removed before the car can be mobile again.

Looking forward to seeing if any or all of these examples can still be considered a proper PLANT and PAYOFF.


I wouldn't call this a plant/payoff, here's why:

Had the plane and it's car carrying platform been setup earlier to beg the question, WHEN IS THIS GOING TO BE USED? I would call it a plant. But if I remember correctly (I may be wrong) I don't think it was. This escape gag was more for audience surprise. then for a lingering EXPECTATION.

Does that make sense?


Thee were great examples!!!!

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#8 aroundworld

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Posted 26 August 2012 - 03:50 PM

QUOTE (kkffoo @ Aug 26 2012, 03:27 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Not sure if I am the right track here, so just one example for the moment.

http://en.wikipedia....i/Basil_the_Rat

Fawlty Towers

"Fawlty Towers is in threat of closure by a Health and Safety inspector. After discovering that Manuel is keeping a pet rat, Basil insists that it be removed, but it escapes back into the hotel as the inspector returns."

Multiple plants: We find out Manuel has a pet, the pet escapes, we meet the health inspector, both rat and health inspector are in the dining room.
Payoff: The health inspector sees the rat when the lid is removed from the cracker tin.

It feels as if the scene is so funny because of the multiple threads which weave together to the conclusion...the situation turns and turns about and the audience expectation is raised, and played with, and the inspector is very close to seeing the rat, but does not...will they get away with it?



YES! LOL!!!!! I love Faulty Towers!

The PLANT: The rat is introduced.

EXPECTATION: We know this is gong to be a problem BUT WE DON'T KNOW WHEN.

"Audience expectation is raised, and played with".


The PAYOFF: The Rat is in the cracker tin.

Great example!!!!



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#9 aroundworld

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Posted 26 August 2012 - 09:55 PM

One of the key elements of the PLANT/PAYOFF tool is TIMING.

We've all seen movies where the protagonist or mentor introduced the PLANT. A moment later our attention is taken off of it, and seemingly the character's too. Now we have forgotten about it.

Then a critical time comes and PAYOFF! We're left sitting there saying to ourselves,

"I totally forgot about that", and there's the PAYOFF! Saving the day.


We forgot about Batman's car sitting there idol. It activates and...etc

We forgot about the breathing apparatus (PLANT) Sherlock saw at his brother's place (IT SAVED HIS LIFE AFTER PLUNGING INTO THE RIVER BELOW) PAYOFF.

We forgot about the clock tower in Back To The Future (mentioned at the beginning of the film "Save the clock tower!") Dr. Emmet Brown used the lighting strike (he knew was coming) to send Mcfly back to the future.

And of course we've all watched the scene where the guy is tending the logs in the fire-place with the fire-poker
while talking to the good guy/bad guy. And in the next scene BIG SURPRISE! He's using the fire-poker to kill/defend him/herself.

AND there are films we've seen where there is a PLANT setup and never used, OR used to late.

What do we say? "He/She could have used it on the monster before it smashed the car...etc. "What a stupid movie!"

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#10 aroundworld

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Posted 26 August 2012 - 10:02 PM

Can you guys think of a film where you forgot about the PLANT, and when the PAYOFF came you were taken by surprise? Think of one or two movies and post it here.

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#11 squirrelygirl

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Posted 26 August 2012 - 11:16 PM

In The Patriot I forgot about the father taking his dead son's metal soldiers until I saw him later in the film melting them down into bullets.

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#12 aroundworld

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Posted 27 August 2012 - 03:05 AM

QUOTE (squirrelygirl @ Aug 26 2012, 11:16 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
In The Patriot I forgot about the father taking his dead son's metal soldiers until I saw him later in the film melting them down into bullets.


Great example Shirl! And think of the emotional impact combined with the timing and purpose of that pay off.


Here's what makes a payoff like that so powerful:

1. We liked the boy, saw him with toy soldiers. (PLANT and PROP ASSOCIATION)

2. The lead soldiers were the boy's, so now we transfer emotion to the toys. Just like Gibson's character does.

3. Audience sympathy is now fully engaged with Gibson.

4. Gibson melts those toy soldiers into bullets (PAYOFF and PROP ASSOCIATION) at a time when he's about to face his greatest challenge for survival.

The personal nature of the PLANT/PAYOFF, along with the timing of it in the story, gave it far more emotional weight than would have been possible if the boy was still alive.

Really good example! THANK YOU!!!

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#13 aroundworld

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Posted 27 August 2012 - 03:35 AM

In Three Days Of The Condor

We see the gun in the drawer when the secretary opens it to let Redford in. Later, when she's killed by the bad guy, are we terribly upset for her? Do we transfer emotion to that gun? No. Why?

Because we never got to know the character.


But the boy in The Patriot is another situation. Even if you didn't see the movie you're touched by the circumstances; the boy is shot dead by British soldiers (revolutionary war). His father melts down the boy's toy (lead) soldiers and makes bullets out of them.

In the above example, we got to know the boy and like him. So we care, transfer emotion to the prop and the PLANT/PAYOFF is much more powerful.

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#14 kkffoo

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Posted 27 August 2012 - 05:27 PM

Red Dwarf
Back to Reality

http://en.wikipedia....ity_(Red_Dwarf)

This is an episode which I really enjoyed.
The crew land on an ocean mood and discover an underwater vessel where all the crew have taken their own lives.
The crew then crash their own ship while avoiding a giant underwater squid.
They then 'wake up' and realise that their whole existence had been as characters in a video game called 'Red Dwarf'
They begin to discover their true non-game identities, and as they do so become more and more depressed and disillusioned, and try to kill themselves.
They are rescued by their computer, who tells them that they have been victims of hallucinations brought on by a 'despair squid'.

Plants: other crew who have killed themselves & giant squid
Surprise Payoff: Discover episode was an hallucination brought on by despair squid.

As the action is so much fun, and plays with the viewers notion of the characters, and also as a side issue of the Red dwarf fans (the characters become their own viewers / fans)..there is so much comedy distraction that the ending is both a complete surprise, and very satisfying.

#15 aroundworld

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Posted 27 August 2012 - 05:56 PM

QUOTE (kkffoo @ Aug 27 2012, 05:27 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Red Dwarf
Back to Reality

http://en.wikipedia....ity_(Red_Dwarf)

This is an episode which I really enjoyed.
The crew land on an ocean mood and discover an underwater vessel where all the crew have taken their own lives.
The crew then crash their own ship while avoiding a giant underwater squid.
They then 'wake up' and realise that their whole existence had been as characters in a video game called 'Red Dwarf'
They begin to discover their true non-game identities, and as they do so become more and more depressed and disillusioned, and try to kill themselves.
They are rescued by their computer, who tells them that they have been victims of hallucinations brought on by a 'despair squid'.

Plants: other crew who have killed themselves & giant squid
Surprise Payoff: Discover episode was an hallucination brought on by despair squid.

As the action is so much fun, and plays with the viewers notion of the characters, and also as a side issue of the Red dwarf fans (the characters become their own viewers / fans)..there is so much comedy distraction that the ending is both a complete surprise, and very satisfying.


You've communicated a complex story MISS-LEAD very clearly! smile.gif BRAVO!!! This scenario looks like a PLANT/PAYOFF but what we call it is a MISS-LEAD.

PLANT /PAYOFF: THE RAT, gun, toy soldiers, oxygen tanks...etc.

MISS-LEAD: Character's identities, plot twists.

"But Steve (you're thinking) it's essentially the same thing!"

I agree! But to keep our story toolbox organized we must clearly define what tool we're using.


We believed the characters we're someone other than who they are;

"They begin to discover their true non-game identities" And so does the audience.


PLANT/PAYOFF = Props

MISS-LEADS = A story twist changing your character's identity or plot direction.


Does that makes sense?


This was an excellent way to cover the difference between story elements (PALNT/PAYOFF) (STORY MISS-LEAD), and we are going to get into more of it later.





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#16 kkffoo

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Posted 27 August 2012 - 06:15 PM

I'm not claiming I have fully understood that..so I expect some more tries might help clarify the issue.

Wizard of Oz

Plant:
Ruby slippers Near the beginning of the movie The Good witch gives Dorothy the (dead) wicked witch of the East's slippers as protection against the wicked witch of the west.
Surprise payoff: At the end, Dorothy finds out she can click her heels together and can go home to Kansas

We know the shoes are magical, but we forget about them by the end of the movie because so much else has happened.

#17 aroundworld

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Posted 27 August 2012 - 06:16 PM

Combining the PLANT/PAYOFF with INTERRUPTION of ROUTINE




Ok, what I would like you guys to try, is take what you've learned about PLANT/PAYOFF and INTERRUPTION of ROUTINE, and combine them in one situation. Just give me one or two paragraphs that uses either a:


Paper clip

Gun

Rag Doll

Ring

Or an object that you've already used in some other story.
PLANT the object in the ROUTINE of your character and PAYOFF during or after the INTERRUPTION.

Take your time.



There is no try, only do or do not.

 

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#18 kkffoo

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Posted 27 August 2012 - 06:44 PM

John is clearing out his gutters, he moves up and down a ladder carrying a scoop (in his left hand he is left handed)
By the side of the house we see him add to a fresh pile of gunk and leaves.
Next to the new wet pile of leaves are older piles of gutter gunk from previous clear-outs. In the old & new piles are some scattered items of rubbish, such as burst balls, broken frisbees, and birds nests.
John is at the top of the ladder poking around, he pulls out a muddied rag doll. The drain pipe flows freely, water overflows the drain and runs down the driveway.
We see the highly polished shoes of local busy body Desiree Winchester being dirtied by the water. She marches up the driveway.
John sees her, sighs, and climbs down the ladder. He stands with his hands behind his back as the waves some 'Vote for the Mayor' campaign leaflets under his nose.
The leaflets have photos of the potential new Mayor.
The Potential new Mayor is seen crossing the street, after shaking hands with a voter. He is wearing an eyepatch.
Desiree calls him over to introduce him to John.
The PNM holds out his hand to shake John's. John brings out both hands from behind his back.
In his left hand a muddy scoop.
In his right the very muddy doll.
The doll has a missing eye.
John and the PNM look at each other.

Plant: Multiple, toys in rubbish pile, PNM shaking hands
Interruption: Desiree calls in
Payoff The handshake / eyepatch

#19 aroundworld

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Posted 27 August 2012 - 10:17 PM

QUOTE (kkffoo @ Aug 27 2012, 06:15 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I'm not claiming I have fully understood that..so I expect some more tries might help clarify the issue.

Wizard of Oz

Plant:
Ruby slippers Near the beginning of the movie The Good witch gives Dorothy the (dead) wicked witch of the East's slippers as protection against the wicked witch of the west.
Surprise payoff: At the end, Dorothy finds out she can click her heels together and can go home to Kansas

We know the shoes are magical, but we forget about them by the end of the movie because so much else has happened.


This is spot on!

We can use PLANT/PAYOFF in varying frequency. The time between the plant and the reveal of the payoff can span the entire movie, just like you pointed out here with Wizard Of OZ.

Or

You can do a PLANT/PAYOFF in a shorter span of time, like your gutter guy and the mayor! Or the Gun in the Condor clip.


The key to making PLANT/PAYOFF really work, (THIS IS TO EVERYONE) is it must have a SOLID, CONCRETE, TANGIBLE connection to your story. It cannot be vague! Make it deliberate and visibal!


[/b]

There is no try, only do or do not.

 

Learn story telling in the MOVIESTORM education forum. 

 

START HERE:  http://www.moviestor...showtopic=13153


#20 aroundworld

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Posted 27 August 2012 - 10:23 PM

QUOTE (kkffoo @ Aug 27 2012, 06:15 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I'm not claiming I have fully understood that..so I expect some more tries might help clarify the issue.

No problem! smile.gif I didn't understand any of these concepts right off, and I'm still learning smile.gif

Wizard of Oz

Plant:
Ruby slippers Near the beginning of the movie The Good witch gives Dorothy the (dead) wicked witch of the East's slippers as protection against the wicked witch of the west.
Surprise payoff: At the end, Dorothy finds out she can click her heels together and can go home to Kansas

We know the shoes are magical, but we forget about them by the end of the movie because so much else has happened.


There is no try, only do or do not.

 

Learn story telling in the MOVIESTORM education forum. 

 

START HERE:  http://www.moviestor...showtopic=13153



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