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Screen writing class, FREE


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#1 aroundworld

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Posted 02 July 2012 - 10:29 PM

HI all,

I was wondering if anyone would have interest in learning or improving their skills in screenwriting. The class would be taught by myself, Steven Adams (aroundworld). I recently graduated from the Academy of Art University with a focus in directing and screen writing. Because these jobs are scarce, I thought that one way to keep my skills sharp would be to teach what I've learned.

This class would not assume skill level and would start with an introduction to story on a college level:

Introduction to Story Telling, Is the first class and would span a fifteen week period.

If you're interested please RSVP here.

Thanks,

Steven Adams
aroundworld

There is no try, only do or do not.

 

Learn story telling in the MOVIESTORM education forum. 

 

START HERE:  http://www.moviestor...showtopic=13153


#2 JosephKw

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Posted 12 August 2012 - 12:57 PM

That sounds awesome. Will it teach all the details regarding proper formatting, like how to present montages, flashbacks, and things like that? In other words, will the emphasis be on improving storytelling, or on how to actually write a professionally-accepted script? Either ways, this sounds like a wonderful opportunity to improve my skills (and I'm using the word liberally here). Thanks so much for offering this.

#3 aroundworld

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Posted 12 August 2012 - 01:45 PM

QUOTE (JosephKw @ Aug 12 2012, 12:57 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
That sounds awesome. Will it teach all the details regarding proper formatting, like how to present montages, flashbacks, and things like that? In other words, will the emphasis be on improving storytelling, or on how to actually write a professionally-accepted script? Either ways, this sounds like a wonderful opportunity to improve my skills (and I'm using the word liberally here). Thanks so much for offering this.




Will it teach all the details regarding proper formatting, like how to present montages, flashbacks, and things like that?

We would get to those details eventually. What I want to do is start with an introduction to story telling. And get into elements that story is based on. For example:


Classical Narrative:
Hollywood tends to focus on the classical narrative. The classical narrative is essentially broken down into a simple three-act structure (more on this later) with all of the loose ends neatly tied up.


Complex Narratives:
Complex narratives utilize multiple stories unfolding simultaneously. Good examples are Pulp Fiction or Crash where several narratives are woven together and intersect at various points.


We will concentrate on the classical narrative.

As far as script formatting, there's a great program called CELTX that formats for you and it's a free DL. Visit the tools and tips section of the forum landing page for link or visit their website - CELTX.COM.





There is no try, only do or do not.

 

Learn story telling in the MOVIESTORM education forum. 

 

START HERE:  http://www.moviestor...showtopic=13153


#4 JosephKw

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Posted 12 August 2012 - 10:30 PM

Thanks so much for the detailed course layout. You can count me in, since I never had any formal training in this, this will be brand new to me.

Thanks for the advice regarding scriptwriting software, but there are still many things it does not know to do unless the writer him/herself writes it in. For example, one shouldn't write in a character's feelings per se, but must couch it in terms of what is seen on screen--you can't write "she feels really sad", but must write"her eyes water, and she bows her head in humiliation." As another example, you must capitalize sound effects that are to be added into the soundtrack--the scriptwriting software won't know how to differentiate between narrative text and sound. Things like that are what I worry about as well.

I see you posted lesson one. I'm on it!

#5 aroundworld

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Posted 13 August 2012 - 12:34 AM

QUOTE (JosephKw @ Aug 12 2012, 10:30 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Thanks so much for the detailed course layout. You can count me in, since I never had any formal training in this, this will be brand new to me.

Thanks for the advice regarding scriptwriting software, but there are still many things it does not know to do unless the writer him/herself writes it in. For example, one shouldn't write in a character's feelings per se, but must couch it in terms of what is seen on screen--you can't write "she feels really sad", but must write"her eyes water, and she bows her head in humiliation." As another example, you must capitalize sound effects that are to be added into the soundtrack--the scriptwriting software won't know how to differentiate between narrative text and sound. Things like that are what I worry about as well.

I see you posted lesson one. I'm on it!


"For example, one shouldn't write in a character's feelings per se, but must couch it in terms of what is seen on screen--you can't write "she feels really sad", but must write"her eyes water, and she bows her head in humiliation."

You're still telling the actor how to perform in the above description. The actor will know by the scene description and dialog what emotion to project. From there, it is the directors job to temper or ramp up that performance, not the writer. Unless the writer is the director.

Example: This is not proper formatting, but for the sake of our example here go's.

INT. JILL'S HOUSE - KITCHEN. DAY

A slip of paper falls from Jack's pocket after getting his keys. Jill snatches it from the floor.

JILL
This is Alicia's number.

JACK
Before you get excited let me -

JILL
You bastard! How could you do this to me?

----------

In the brief example above I wrote no emotional directives at all, yet the fundamental emotion of the scene is communicated (jealousy, outrage); it's obvious Jack and Jill are having a fight. The initial emotion is quite clear. The actress might choose to turn on the tears, maybe the director will tell her to be too angry to cry at this moment. Depends on how they want to portray the scene.

My point is, as the writer I got the idea across in a CLEAR, CONCRETE and TANGIBLE way what emotions should populate the scene without "telling" the actor how to do that.



Good input! smile.gif

There is no try, only do or do not.

 

Learn story telling in the MOVIESTORM education forum. 

 

START HERE:  http://www.moviestor...showtopic=13153


#6 JosephKw

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Posted 13 August 2012 - 12:11 PM

Ah, thanks for that example and clarification. I hope you don't mind my constant questions--they're not meant to be argumentative, but just expressing my curiosity and sincere desire to learn from your experience and knowledge.

#7 aroundworld

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Posted 13 August 2012 - 06:55 PM

QUOTE (JosephKw @ Aug 13 2012, 12:11 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Ah, thanks for that example and clarification. I hope you don't mind my constant questions--they're not meant to be argumentative, but just expressing my curiosity and sincere desire to learn from your experience and knowledge.


There's never a bad question when you're learning. Every teacher I ever had that got an attitude because I asked to many questions wasn't teaching, they were just collecting a paycheck. I don't have a bad attitude, nor am I collecting a paycheck! laugh.gif

So ask away, I'm here to help!

There is no try, only do or do not.

 

Learn story telling in the MOVIESTORM education forum. 

 

START HERE:  http://www.moviestor...showtopic=13153


#8 rgr

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Posted 13 August 2012 - 10:40 PM

QUOTE (JosephKw @ Aug 12 2012, 10:30 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Thanks so much for the detailed course layout. You can count me in, since I never had any formal training in this, this will be brand new to me.

Thanks for the advice regarding scriptwriting software, but there are still many things it does not know to do unless the writer him/herself writes it in. For example, one shouldn't write in a character's feelings per se, but must couch it in terms of what is seen on screen--you can't write "she feels really sad", but must write"her eyes water, and she bows her head in humiliation." As another example, you must capitalize sound effects that are to be added into the soundtrack--the scriptwriting software won't know how to differentiate between narrative text and sound. Things like that are what I worry about as well.

I see you posted lesson one. I'm on it!

I have similar interests, Joseph. I was basically told I write too much like a novel, which I sort of get, but practicing good screen writing with proper lessons would be a big help.

My schedule is tough these days, but I'm definitely interested.

#9 aroundworld

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Posted 14 August 2012 - 12:25 AM

QUOTE (rgr @ Aug 13 2012, 10:40 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I have similar interests, Joseph. I was basically told I write too much like a novel, which I sort of get, but practicing good screen writing with proper lessons would be a big help.

My schedule is tough these days, but I'm definitely interested.


Jump on in RGR! Assignment 1 is ready for you. Just go to the topic and read the simple lesson there. Learning the art of screen writing is a fun and an eye opening experience. I think Screen writing is the Haiku of visual text.

There is no try, only do or do not.

 

Learn story telling in the MOVIESTORM education forum. 

 

START HERE:  http://www.moviestor...showtopic=13153


#10 JosephKw

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Posted 14 August 2012 - 05:07 AM

Hi RGR! Glad to hear that. I hope you can squeeze some time in. Looking forward to seeing you "in" class.


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