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SCREEN WRITING CLASS - MOD 10


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#1 aroundworld

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Posted 04 April 2013 - 11:35 PM

Characters



In this module, we’re going to take an in-depth look at creating memorable Characters.
To begin, think about the ways you are introduced to characters.

What do the storytellers provide us to gain insight into the emotional core of the character?

First, characters are defined by their actions. This is very important.

Second, characters are defined by their reactions.


Think back to the module where we studied distinct reactions and moral choices. Both of these provide excellent insight into the story’s characters.

Dialogue is also a good tool to shed light on a character’s true nature but should not be
the sole means. It’s important to show, rather than tell.

This is what makes film unique as a medium. It’s motion pictures. Motion, movement,
action. Moving images. Take advantage of it. Use it in your storytelling.



Sketching Out Characters



When we begin to sketch out characters for our stories we should try to:

1. Create sympathetic characters

How can this be achieved? Sympathetic characters are the victims of injustice; they perform acts of kindness,
generosity or bravery. Of course the list is endless but you’ll get the idea from these examples.

2. Create compelling characters

If a character cannot be sympathetic, make him or her compelling. They can be
extraordinary at what they do. They can be entertaining, intelligent, dangerous or
psychotic.

The Darth Vader character from Star Wars is not a sympathetic character but he sure is
compelling. Aside from being a menacing genius, he is an expert in the Jedi arts and a
lethal instrument for the dark side.

There is no try, only do or do not.

 

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#2 aroundworld

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Posted 04 April 2013 - 11:46 PM

Assignment



Fictitious Character Profile



Create a fictitious character profile. Give your character a name, an age, an
occupation, a nationality, a brief history.


This should not exceed a half a page in length.

Then, using this character, create a premise and a central question.

Purpose:

To practice creating characters, premises and central questions.

There is no try, only do or do not.

 

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#3 JosephKw

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Posted 05 April 2013 - 06:39 AM

Name: Plato
Age: 3 years
Occupation: Companion dog
Nationality: Shi Zhu
Brief History: Birth and past history unknown. Picked up in an alley scavenging trash. Placed in the Alameda Animal Shelter. Adopted by Mel Ein and Melisa Ein (an elderly couple). Plato is a "velcro dog", meaning he always stays next to his master, Mel. When Mel had the "runs", Plato would run back and forth from the TV room to the bathroom door everytime Mel had to "go". Plato hates bathing, so the only way Mel could bathe him is to take a bath himself; that is the only way Plato would enter the tub.

Title: Forever Home

Premise: Mel and Plato crash en route to the vet, and both perish. They both become ghosts. Mel sees the light but refuses to cross over, and instead stays with his wife, Melissa. Plato chooses to stay with Mel and Melissa. Melissa accepts their company until she, too, dies years later. Mel and Melissa cross over into heaven. Plato, being a dog, is not allowed into human heaven. Mel's house is sold and torn down to make room for a condo. Plato roams the alleys, alone again. Mel and Melissa abandon heaven so they can be a family again with their faithful companion, here on earth, in an abandoned house.

Central Question: (Gads, MUST I do another CQ? I can never grasp the semantics. Anyways, here it goes...) CQ = Can a loyal dog follow his master after death, even if it means being a ghost?






#4 kkffoo

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Posted 05 April 2013 - 09:02 AM

Create a fictitious character profile. Give your character a name, an age, an
occupation, a nationality, a brief history.

Name: Dulcet Tones
Age: 21
Occupation : Advertising and promotion
Nationality: Dutch

Born Hendrik Meertens in a run down Rotterdam suburb, the teenager ran an illegal flyposting business to save for gender reassignment surgery .
Escaping her abusive father and alcoholic mother, Dulcet found true happiness in the arms of elderly tug boat captain, Jan Van Bergen.
Devastated when the tipsy captain made a pass at the cabin boy, the tragic heroine fled once more, only to be arrested for Jan's murder.

Can Dulcet prove her innocence and find true love with handsome arresting officer Gerrit Fisser? Or will murderous cabin boy Olaf fulfil his evil plan to take over her flyposting empire?

#5 aroundworld

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Posted 15 April 2013 - 01:38 AM

QUOTE (JosephKw @ Apr 5 2013, 6:39 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Name: Plato
Age: 3 years
Occupation: Companion dog
Nationality: Shi Zhu
Brief History: Birth and past history unknown. Picked up in an alley scavenging trash. Placed in the Alameda Animal Shelter. Adopted by Mel Ein and Melisa Ein (an elderly couple). Plato is a "velcro dog", meaning he always stays next to his master, Mel. When Mel had the "runs", Plato would run back and forth from the TV room to the bathroom door everytime Mel had to "go". Plato hates bathing, so the only way Mel could bathe him is to take a bath himself; that is the only way Plato would enter the tub.

Title: Forever Home

Premise: Mel and Plato crash en route to the vet, and both perish. They both become ghosts. Mel sees the light but refuses to cross over, and instead stays with his wife, Melissa. Plato chooses to stay with Mel and Melissa. Melissa accepts their company until she, too, dies years later. Mel and Melissa cross over into heaven. Plato, being a dog, is not allowed into human heaven. Mel's house is sold and torn down to make room for a condo. Plato roams the alleys, alone again. Mel and Melissa abandon heaven so they can be a family again with their faithful companion, here on earth, in an abandoned house.

Ok, This story (as usual) is very creative, Bravo! However, one element of tension is absent. What happens of they leave heaven? I know they're leaving paradise to live as ghosts on earth whit their dog. But heaven is a rather broad description. and doesn't really present a tangible source of tension / sacrifice for living with the dog. THERE MUST BE SOMETHING CONNECTED to leaving heaven that effects another person / some one's destiny... etc. Something MUST hang in the balance for they're decision to be critical.

So, you don't have to re-write this. Just give me a sentence with a possible negative result of their actions
(leaving heaven). Does this create a possible negative outcome for someone on earth? ....etc


Central Question: (Gads, MUST I do another CQ? I can never grasp the semantics. Anyways, here it goes...) CQ = Can a loyal dog follow his master after death, even if it means being a ghost?


Can a loyal dog follow his master after death, even if it means being a ghost?


Ok, we'd sort of expect him to be a ghost to follow him after death, right?
So, there needs to be a more critical element here to make this work.

Can a loyal dog follow his master after death, even if it means being a ghost?


Can a loyal dog RESCUE his master from xyz, even if it means dying to become a ghost?


I know I only wrote xyz for the critical danger element, but look at the difference in dramatic effect between the two. This is what you want. There must be something AT RISK!


Try it again. smile.gif







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#6 aroundworld

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Posted 15 April 2013 - 02:12 AM

QUOTE (kkffoo @ Apr 5 2013, 9:02 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Create a fictitious character profile. Give your character a name, an age, an
occupation, a nationality, a brief history.

Name: Dulcet Tones
Age: 21
Occupation : Advertising and promotion
Nationality: Dutch

Born Hendrik Meertens in a run down Rotterdam suburb, the teenager ran an illegal flyposting business to save for gender reassignment surgery . Escaping her abusive father and alcoholic mother, Dulcet found true happiness in the arms of elderly tug boat captain, Jan Van Bergen. Devastated when the tipsy captain made a pass at the cabin boy, the tragic heroine fled once more, only to be arrested for Jan's murder.

Can Dulcet prove her innocence and find true love with handsome arresting officer Gerrit Fisser? Or will murderous cabin boy Olaf fulfill his evil plan to take over her flyposting empire?

THIS IS FANTASTIC! Exactly what I'm looking for!!!!


Now, lets take a look at why this works.

WE MEET THE CHARACTER Born Hendrik Meertens in a

SETTING run down Rotterdam suburb, the teenager ran an illegal flyposting business

GOAL to save for gender reassignment surgery . Escaping her abusive father and alcoholic mother, Dulcet found

SUB PLOT GOAL true happiness in the arms of elderly tug boat captain, Jan Van Bergen. Devastated when the tipsy captain made a pass at the cabin boy, the tragic heroine fled once more, only to be

OBSTICAL arrested for Jan's murder.


This is structured beautifully, Kate. This is how its done!!! BRAVO!





Kate on my second read, there's just one thing I realized you need to add to the synopsis... you should mention officer Gerrit Fisser. other wise this works really well!

Can you give me a version of the synopsis with him in it?

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#7 JosephKw

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Posted 16 April 2013 - 07:54 AM

It looks like I've run into the same problem again with the Central Question (just like I knew I would). Although you provided a textbook CQ again, the problem is it does not match the existing story. The dog does not die in a heroic effort to save anyone; he just dies along with his master when the car crashes. Is the exercise to distill the existing story into a CQ, or is it to devise a perfect CQ and write a story around that?
What would be the proper CQ for my existing story (so I know how to compare it to the CQ I drummed up)?

Regarding the tension comment, this story is about the dog (the central character which you assigned us to come up with). The masters coming back from heaven is only in the ending; so does it matter what they risked (being only minor characters)? I think the risk here is for the dog--by foregoing heaven himself just to remain with his masters, he risks eternal abandonment here on earth after his masters leave (abandon) him.

Hmmm...I think I just came up with an alternate CQ then LOL. CQ = When a dog foregoes entering heaven just to remain with his masters, does he risk eternal abandonment here on earth after his masters leave him? How's that?

#8 aroundworld

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Posted 18 April 2013 - 04:51 AM

QUOTE (JosephKw @ Apr 16 2013, 7:54 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
It looks like I've run into the same problem again with the Central Question (just like I knew I would). Although you provided a textbook CQ again, the problem is it does not match the existing story. The dog does not die in a heroic effort to save anyone; he just dies along with his master when the car crashes. Is the exercise to distill the existing story into a CQ, or is it to devise a perfect CQ and write a story around that?
What would be the proper CQ for my existing story (so I know how to compare it to the CQ I drummed up)?

Regarding the tension comment, this story is about the dog (the central character which you assigned us to come up with). The masters coming back from heaven is only in the ending; so does it matter what they risked (being only minor characters)? I think the risk here is for the dog--by foregoing heaven himself just to remain with his masters, he risks eternal abandonment here on earth after his masters leave (abandon) him.

Hmmm...I think I just came up with an alternate CQ then LOL. CQ = When a dog foregoes entering heaven just to remain with his masters, does he risk eternal abandonment here on earth after his masters leave him? How's that?

Yes that works! But you can tell us that his maters die.


When a dog forgoes heaven to remain as a ghost with his master, does he risk eternal abandonment when his master dies?


I think I stayed in your stories context. But look at the language between your and mine. The journey is implied much more clearly when you identify whats causing the tension. Making it tangible. His master doesn't just leave. He dies! So did the dog forgo heaven for no reason... ?
is he forever abandon....


Food for thought! nice effort! smile.gif



Ok, the reason I change the story JK, is to give you and example of what your story needs. The CQ, is a mini story with a question (hook) at the end. Many times writers use this to keep them on track.

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#9 aroundworld

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Posted 21 April 2013 - 04:48 PM

Il post a new assignment today guys, sorry for the confusion. it will eveing my time EST USA,



Cheers, Steve A

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#10 aroundworld

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Posted 25 April 2013 - 02:01 AM

Character Arc




A character arc can be defined as a gradual character shift over the course of the story
where a character changes into a more fully realized person. They usually change for the
better.

They start in one place, and then as a result of the story’s journey, they arrive in a new
place, a changed person.

For novice writers trying to break into the film industry, this is an especially important
element to your writing. Hollywood loves character arcs.

Without a good character arc it’s more difficult to attract marquee actors to the material which, in turn, makes it more difficult to get the film financed and distributed.

When an actor reads a script, one of the first things they’ll look for is the arc in their
character. What does the character learn?

How does the character change? Is this a character I really want to play? Are there moments of brilliance written into the script that could possibly put me in consideration for awards?




Markers




These are tell-tale signs of a gradual shift in the character’s arc. Characters cannot just
change on a dime. It isn’t believable. Keeping this in mind, it’s a good idea to map out a character shift in their arc over the course of your story.


Markers usually appear in the second act onward. The first act is
spent establishing the character and allowing the audience a glimpse of what needs to be
changed as a result of the pending journey (the story of the movie).

An example that comes to mind is the first Jurassic Park. Early on it’s established that Sam
Neill’s character is uncomfortable with kids.


By the end of the movie, he has a kid under each arm and Laura Dern smiles believing
that he’s finally ready for fatherhood.

We can clearly see that Sam Neill’s character has changed as a result of the experiences
he endured in the story. He has finally overcome his discomfort with children and is now a
more fully realized character.



A Character Arc is Not Necessary for Every Character


Now you should have a pretty good idea of what a character arc entails. Always keep this
in mind when you’re laying out the foundations of your own narrative. It’s not necessary
that every character have an arc.

In fact, it would be a little overwhelming as some characters are included for the sole
purpose of nothing more than servicing the story. I would suggest sticking to the main
character or characters.



ASSIGNMENT



Give me three examples of films you have seen with memorable character arcs. Include the MARKERS (key moments) that transformed that character to make him / her fully realized by the end of the movie.


Remember in include the markers ... the events that caused changes in their life to make them a more fully realized person on the screen.

There is no try, only do or do not.

 

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#11 kkffoo

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Posted 25 April 2013 - 10:55 AM

Toy Story
Buzz Lightyear

Buzz starts out as a bit of an ego-maniac, believing his own hype and expecting everyone to treat him as a hero.
He ends up more realistic and humble, but having made friends and being much happier.

Marker: when Buzz tries to fly out of the window after being captured by Sid, he goes through a self-realisation as he can't really fly, he is just a toy...but Woody persuades him that being a toy is a good thing after all.

Wayne's World 2
Garth

Garth is a decent guy, but a bit of a dweeb.
In Wayne's world 2 he has his first sexual encounter with a woman...Honey Hornée.
Afterwards he is seen wearing a smoking jacket and smoking a pipe...........Wayne tells him that he is now 'a man'.

Apart from being extremely funny, this mini character arc is one of the many which make this movie series fun.
The marker is meeting a dream woman in a laundromat.

The King's Speech
King George

Prince to King character arc, as Prince Albert learns to deal with his speech impediment, and become a leader, King George

Marker - there are many - one which struck me was when the speech therapist Logan managed to get the prince to unbutton enough to swear and let out emotion.

#12 JosephKw

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Posted 28 April 2013 - 07:42 AM

Han Solo from "Star Wars: A New Hope"

Han is introduced as a scoundrel on the lookout for money, and maybe some daring stunts so he can brag about them later. Eventually he meets up with a beautiful princess whom he falls for. He asks his friend Luke "what do you think--do you think a princess and a guy like me..." and Luke answers "no". He also says to his friend Chewbacca "Either I'm beginning to like her (the princess) or I'm gonna kill her!". Yet the princess is selfless and sacrifices everything for the hope of freeing the galaxy from the galactic empire. This heroic naivete rubs off on Han, who at the end of the film comes back to save the day against overwhelming odds.



Samwise Gamgee from "the Lord of the Rings"

Sam starts off as a bumbling gardener who gets caught up in a great adventure solely because of his eavesdropping. There is no clear marker which makes him change, but rather his courage and spirit is revealed through a series of events. One such event is when Frodo runs away on a canoe, and Sam swims after him, even though he couldn't swim, which forces Frodo to pull him onto his canoe. Sam simply says "I promised Gandalf not to leave you, and I intend to keep that promise." He also makes a lengthy monologue at the end of the second film about why we fight ("Because there's still good left in this world, and that's worth fighting for"). At the end Sam not only carries the ring to the end of their quest, but he hefts Frodo up onto his shoulder as well.



Quade from "Total Recall" (the Ahnuld version)

Quade starts off as an honest and honorable working-class man. As events unfold around him and he finds himself in the middle of a deadly spy thriller, he still behaves as any other civilian would--lost and overwhelmed. The markers would be when he slowly realizes his innate skills as a super sleuth/assassin, and starts taking out droves of baddies, yet he still remains honorable. In the end, when he informed (by himself via a pre-recorded message) that he is only an imprinted false personality, and that he will be returned to his own original self, have lots of money, and get the babe to boot, he still resists and does the honorable thing (killing all the baddies). So in this instance the character's personality stays pretty much the same as when he's introduced to us, except he ends up being a superspy in addition to that.

#13 aroundworld

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Posted 01 May 2013 - 11:18 AM

QUOTE (kkffoo @ Apr 25 2013, 10:55 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Toy Story
Buzz Lightyear

Buzz starts out as a bit of an ego-maniac, believing his own hype and expecting everyone to treat him as a hero.
He ends up more realistic and humble, but having made friends and being much happier.

Marker: when Buzz tries to fly out of the window after being captured by Sid, he goes through a self-realisation as he can't really fly, he is just a toy...but Woody persuades him that being a toy is a good thing after all.

This is a crystal clear example of a character arch (the changes a character goes through).
NOTE, that it is EXTERNAL INFLUENCES acting on Buzz that get him to change NOT actions he takes himself! Characters always change because of EXTERNAL INFLUENCES influences.



Wayne's World 2
Garth

Garth is a decent guy, but a bit of a dweeb.
In Wayne's world 2 he has his first sexual encounter with a woman...Honey Hornée.
Afterwards he is seen wearing a smoking jacket and smoking a pipe...........Wayne tells him that he is now 'a man'.

Apart from being extremely funny, this mini character arc is one of the many which make this movie series fun.
The marker is meeting a dream woman in a laundromat.

VERY, clean and clear example! It's simple, and uncomplicated. AGAIN, EXTERNAL INFLUENCES acting on the character, bringing the change.



The King's Speech
King George

Prince to King character arc, as Prince Albert learns to deal with his speech impediment, and become a leader, King George

Marker - there are many - one which struck me was when the speech therapist Logan managed to get the prince to unbutton enough to swear and let out emotion.

This is perhaps one of the best examples! Because the marker is wrapped in so many other moments of the film, one could over look it. One more time, External influence the (SPEECH THERAPIST) acting on the prince to bring change! Taking him from reserved and stuttering to expressive and motivated!


BRAVO! These are all very clear examples Kate! NOTE: each example you gave have TANGIBLE, CONCRETE, SOLID reasons for change! EXTERNAL INFLUENCES acting on the character to make them a more fully realized person on the screen.

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#14 aroundworld

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Posted 04 May 2013 - 01:25 PM

QUOTE (JosephKw @ Apr 28 2013, 7:42 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Han Solo from "Star Wars: A New Hope"

Han is introduced as a scoundrel on the lookout for money, and maybe some daring stunts so he can brag about them later. Eventually he meets up with a beautiful princess whom he falls for. He asks his friend Luke "what do you think--do you think a princess and a guy like me..." and Luke answers "no". He also says to his friend Chewbacca "Either I'm beginning to like her (the princess) or I'm gonna kill her!". Yet the princess is selfless and sacrifices everything for the hope of freeing the galaxy from the galactic empire. This heroic naivete rubs off on Han, who at the end of the film comes back to save the day against overwhelming odds.


This is a good example, but where are the MARKERS? What EVENTS influenced his transformation? I asked you to show me a MARKER, an event that got him on the path to becoming a changed person. I want you to be specific.



Samwise Gamgee from "the Lord of the Rings"

Sam starts off as a bumbling gardener who gets caught up in a great adventure solely because of his eavesdropping. There is no clear marker which makes him change, but rather his courage and spirit is revealed through a series of events. One such event is when Frodo runs away on a canoe, and Sam swims after him, even though he couldn't swim, which forces Frodo to pull him onto his canoe. Sam simply says "I promised Gandalf not to leave you, and I intend to keep that promise." He also makes a lengthy monologue at the end of the second film about why we fight ("Because there's still good left in this world, and that's worth fighting for"). At the end Sam not only carries the ring to the end of their quest, but he hefts Frodo up onto his shoulder as well.

To a point I agree. However, what about the time when he starts learning sword play? If I remember, that is the first and most telling part of whats to come for him. That IS the marker that tells us Sam is going to defend Frodo. And one of the PAY OFFs to that is his fight with the spider.



Quade from "Total Recall" (the Ahnuld version)

Quade starts off as an honest and honorable working-class man. As events unfold around him and he finds himself in the middle of a deadly spy thriller, he still behaves as any other civilian would--lost and overwhelmed. The markers would be when he slowly realizes his innate skills as a super sleuth/assassin, and starts taking out droves of baddies, yet he still remains honorable. In the end, when he informed (by himself via a pre-recorded message) that he is only an imprinted false personality, and that he will be returned to his own original self, have lots of money, and get the babe to boot, he still resists and does the honorable thing (killing all the baddies). So in this instance the character's personality stays pretty much the same as when he's introduced to us, except he ends up being a superspy in addition to that.


These are good examples JK! But when you do an exercise like this, Id like you to separate the MARKERS out from the rest of the text. It helps delineate the events and just gives a clearer example of WHEN the charaters transformation began.

These are good examples and some really good observations!
smile.gif

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#15 JosephKw

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Posted 08 May 2013 - 11:05 AM

Yeah, sorry if my markers for Han Solo and the other examples were part of the overall text.

As for Samwise Gamgee in "Lord of the Rings", the film did not show him learning swordplay (that was the other two Hobbits, Pippin and Merry). The sword lessons are markers for Pippin and Merry becoming brave warriors in the third film though.

#16 aroundworld

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Posted 08 May 2013 - 11:30 AM

QUOTE (JosephKw @ May 8 2013, 11:05 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Yeah, sorry if my markers for Han Solo and the other examples were part of the overall text.

As for Samwise Gamgee in "Lord of the Rings", the film did not show him learning swordplay (that was the other two Hobbits, Pippin and Merry). The sword lessons are markers for Pippin and Merry becoming brave warriors in the third film though.



I sit corrected JK! smile.gif But over all theses are strong examples and I can see you get the whole concept. Thanks for correcting my error in memory. It's been a while since I've seen the film.

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#17 aroundworld

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Posted 08 May 2013 - 11:31 AM

Do you guys have any other observations you want to add here before we move on?

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#18 kkffoo

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Posted 08 May 2013 - 06:40 PM

I've been trying to understand the reason for Gulliver's travels being so dire, despite seeming to have a good set up to create a character arc (we watched the film this week)
Gulliver starts in the mail room, lack of ambition at work, can't get the girl, his junior is promoted over him, then almost by accident he gets the chance to write a travel feature.
By the end, he has had many adventure, learned much, made mistakes, experienced growth, gets the girl, goes back, gets the promotion....but the whole thing was so horribly forced....and self contradictory...and written as if nobody really cared what happened...despite the funny bits, and spectacular effects.
I'm reminded of my Meryl Streep moment a few classes ago...the formula is in place but I just wasn't buying the story somehow, or the central character's path.
In some ways, the film wasn't formulaic enough, it felt like lack of respect for the audience, a kind of knowing 'this is a cliché, we're too cool to invest in it fully'.

#19 aroundworld

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Posted 09 May 2013 - 10:23 PM

QUOTE (kkffoo @ May 8 2013, 6:40 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I've been trying to understand the reason for Gulliver's travels being so dire, despite seeming to have a good set up to create a character arc (we watched the film this week)
Gulliver starts in the mail room, lack of ambition at work, can't get the girl, his junior is promoted over him, then almost by accident he gets the chance to write a travel feature.
By the end, he has had many adventure, learned much, made mistakes, experienced growth, gets the girl, goes back, gets the promotion....but the whole thing was so horribly forced....and self contradictory...and written as if nobody really cared what happened...despite the funny bits, and spectacular effects.
I'm reminded of my Meryl Streep moment a few classes ago...the formula is in place but I just wasn't buying the story somehow, or the central character's path.
In some ways, the film wasn't formulaic enough, it felt like lack of respect for the audience, a kind of knowing 'this is a cliché, we're too cool to invest in it fully'.



This is a great observation, Kate!

The up side to this kind of film is EVERYTHING IS CRYSTAL CLEAR! You can clearly see every aspect of the characters struggle.

You detailed in your post; the characters ARCH... his change. Why he changed what the external forces acting on him were to cause growth.

Meet the character, See his goal, Interruption of routine the inciting incident, enter the new world (ACT II). Meeting his ally, the 2 turn around, inciting indecent of ACT II leading to ACT III. The main struggle the victory and the resolution.


Try and look at this as an opportunity to break the story down into what you're leaned in the class.

It can be irritating I know, but I like these films because everything is out there... the plot is so simple everthing we've learned in class is exposed in very simple drama. A good learning tool.



This an aside:

These types of films have there good and bad points. as an aside, finacially there is no down side to this. here's why:

This was done deliberately. There's actually a demographic that wants this kind of movie. The cast is automatically bankable, the box office draw is predictable as the story. IT WAS ALL DONE ON PURPOSE! Hard to believe I know ;-).

But as unremarkable as this film seems I guarantee they made a profit on it. These films spend a week in the theater... then go to streaming ... and is released in the European / Asian markets. Sent to Airlines for flight entertainment.... on and on it goes. This film made money. All because it was formulaic.


There is no try, only do or do not.

 

Learn story telling in the MOVIESTORM education forum. 

 

START HERE:  http://www.moviestor...showtopic=13153


#20 JosephKw

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Posted 10 May 2013 - 04:14 AM

I haven't seen this new "Gulliver's Travels", but I think Kate's point is that just because something follows a formula doesn't guarantee its success. If that was the case, then every Hollywood movie would be a success.

However, I am seeing how valuable this formula (and this course) is in improving a film's story and maximizing its potential. I've already applied this to some of my existing films and stories and have noted how I could have tweaked some parts here and there to improve their appeal.

I feel the difference between a formulated Hollywood megahit and a merely profitable film is the input and insights of a talented storyteller (primarily the director, and secondly a good screenplay writer). It's like a master chef creating a meal from the same recipe an amateur uses; a good recipe provides a solid foundation--without which the dish is a hit-or-miss gamble, but it's the creator's interpretive touches which elevates the dish into a culinary masterpiece.


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