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Lesson ideas - art & music


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#1 Moviestorm

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Posted 13 March 2011 - 12:33 PM

We're putting together various ideas for how teachers can use Moviestorm in the classroom. We'd love your feedback on these - which ones work, which don't, how could they be improved, and so on. If you've actually tried any of these, let us know how it went.

And of course, please contribute any of your own!

Biography
Create a biography of an artist or musician. Intersperse presentation with slides and music to create a documentary. If appropriate, enhance it with reconstructed scenes from the era or the person’s life.
Benefits: adding multimedia content increases the depth of understanding and research, and enables the student to approach the subject in a richer way than just using written text and still images. Providing narration builds confidence in speaking without needing to do it in front of an audience or camera. Creating reconstructed scenes is fun and engaging, requires further research, and encourages an imaginative approach to the subject.

Music video
Pick a piece of music and make a video for it. This could include still images, sequences of musicians performing, or story segments.
Benefits: the student develops an understanding of the relationship between music and visual images, or between music and story. Cutting in time with music helps to develop a sense of rhythm and tempo.

Video report
Create a video report on a particular artistic style, movement, or period. Intersperse presentation with slides and music to create a documentary. If appropriate, enhance it with reconstructed scenes from the era or the person’s life.
Benefits: adding multimedia content increases the depth of understanding and research, and enables the student to approach the subject in a richer way than just using written text and still images. Providing narration builds confidence in speaking without needing to do it in front of an audience or camera. Creating reconstructed scenes is fun and engaging, requires further research, and encourages an imaginative approach to the subject.

Art gallery
Create a portfolio of artwork and present it in an interesting environment. This could be the student’s own work, the work of an artist being studied, or a theme. Have a presenter walk around and talk about the artwork. Enhance the presentation with on-screen text and music.
Benefits: this provides an interesting and engaging approach, and requires the student to think about context and placement of art, not just individual pieces in isolation. Creating themes requires the student to research, compare and contrast different items. Adding music requires the student to think about the emotions aroused by the art and find good juxtaposition. Adding on-screen text as well as narration helps the student learn to present many layers of information at once. If the student is creating a gallery of their own work, this can be posted online.

Art sale
Create a short video persuading the viewer to buy a piece of art. This could be presented in the style of, say, an auction house promotional video, a TV advert, or a segment on a shopping channel. The piece should talk informatively about the piece, its history, the techniques involved and the artist. It should also explain the valuation and make the viewer want to buy it. Students can then vote on each others’ work and pick the most popular.
Benefits: the student has to go into a lot of detail on a single piece, covering both the historical and commercial angles. This is a fun way to present artwork, and allows the students to get slightly tongue in cheek – for example a QVC-style sales pitch for the Mona Lisa, or Sotheby’s trying to sell a drawing by an up and coming young artist, the student themselves. The student also has to be able to show passion for the piece of artwork, and this helps them get interested.


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#2 neut

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Posted 16 March 2011 - 11:00 AM

when I was a little more involved with KS3 teaching and had more year 9 classes, music for media was one of the topics I taught in the music lesson. Students loved the topic as composition is something that non music background students sometimes really struggle with. They tend to lose interest if they feel they are not progressing. We where using gargeband and importing movies from the likes of The movies, sims etc with all sound removed students then worked on recreating everything even down to putting VO's on the track. It was a highly rewarding experience and as a result some students that wouldn't normally opt for KS4 music did and where very sucessful.

Now that the national curriculum has changed again for KS3 music and we have more control over how we deliver it I would like to bring the module back into the classroom. This time though students could explore music and sound for film from both perspectives (sight and sound) and over the course of a term(maybe2) students could in short be shown how music and sound work in film, through taught lessons and taught some of the key things to look out for when composing for film (Motifs, Pace, Dynamics etc)


In small groups Create a movie for 3 - 5 mins with a choice of genre with a script (if necessary)

Once the movie is complete swap it with another group who will then concentrate on composing the soundtrack, adding sound effects, recording dialogue etc.

Present the final movies in a final assessment based showing

There are so many skills that students will achieve from doing a project like this other than just a bulk standard typical music lesson, which could in turn prepare them or even introduce them to particular subjects in Keystage 4 (Drama, Media, Music/Music tech) or even Keystage 5 (film studies, Music technology)

It would also help with writing skills, compositional skills, ICT skills, enhance social sillks, team building and organisation skills, develop confidence, etc.

what do you think?

(Apologies for the waffle but lying in bed feeling totally sorry for myself with a serious case of man flu setting cover sad.gif so I'm on a bit of a roll)



neut



#3 flashman

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Posted 16 March 2011 - 07:05 PM

I am not sure whether this is relevant, but I created a stock live music video, putting in typical rock performance from the characters, and then laid two completely different tracks (a fast one and a slow one) over the top to see if they worked.
I was surprised by the results!

http://www.moviestor...p;vid_id=106649
http://www.moviestor...p;vid_id=106650

I think what I am suggesting here is that it can be quite easy to make a decent animated music video, and that there is scope for matching a pre-made music video to a pre-made track to good effect. With a bit of tweaking, they could be very effective.

BTW, this is a very old movie, so please excuse the use of shadows.
Andrew Kennedy
MD, Moviestorm Ltd.

#4 skratchmasta

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Posted 05 April 2011 - 01:08 PM

Hi neut,

This is a great idea. Integrated sound is an excellent opportunity for some ready made educational templates. recently I have been creating templates as a request from a media studies teacher. These short sequences consist of ready made sets characters and animation. Its the students job to create the camera shots.

Do you think this idea could be applied to music? I could easily create a movie that has no sound or dialogue so that the student can import or record their own backing track and VO.

What genre and scenarios have you used? What kind of movie would be of most use to you? If you have had any ideas for lessons we could create them and implement them into the default interface to make them available to all teachers. I'd love to get some feedback

Kind Regards,
Alex
Alex Gowland
Moviestorm Ltd.

#5 Guest_drewwilliam_*

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Posted 02 June 2011 - 05:44 AM

I am doing my graduation in music and I want to know some ideas about it. I hope you will help me to write one documentary on music.

#6 primaveranz

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Posted 02 June 2011 - 06:48 AM

QUOTE (flashman @ Mar 17 2011, 06:05 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>


Did you remove this one Andrew? I get a message saying "You are not allowed to view this Video"

"If we only use 1/3 of our brain, what's the other 1/3 for?"


#7 rgr

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Posted 02 June 2011 - 08:42 PM

QUOTE (Moviestorm @ Mar 13 2011, 12:33 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
We're putting together various ideas for how teachers can use Moviestorm in the classroom. We'd love your feedback on these - which ones work, which don't, how could they be improved, and so on. If you've actually tried any of these, let us know how it went.

And of course, please contribute any of your own!

Biography
Create a biography of an artist or musician. Intersperse presentation with slides and music to create a documentary. If appropriate, enhance it with reconstructed scenes from the era or the person’s life.
Benefits: adding multimedia content increases the depth of understanding and research, and enables the student to approach the subject in a richer way than just using written text and still images. Providing narration builds confidence in speaking without needing to do it in front of an audience or camera. Creating reconstructed scenes is fun and engaging, requires further research, and encourages an imaginative approach to the subject.

Music video
Pick a piece of music and make a video for it. This could include still images, sequences of musicians performing, or story segments.
Benefits: the student develops an understanding of the relationship between music and visual images, or between music and story. Cutting in time with music helps to develop a sense of rhythm and tempo.

Video report
Create a video report on a particular artistic style, movement, or period. Intersperse presentation with slides and music to create a documentary. If appropriate, enhance it with reconstructed scenes from the era or the person’s life.
Benefits: adding multimedia content increases the depth of understanding and research, and enables the student to approach the subject in a richer way than just using written text and still images. Providing narration builds confidence in speaking without needing to do it in front of an audience or camera. Creating reconstructed scenes is fun and engaging, requires further research, and encourages an imaginative approach to the subject.

Art gallery
Create a portfolio of artwork and present it in an interesting environment. This could be the student’s own work, the work of an artist being studied, or a theme. Have a presenter walk around and talk about the artwork. Enhance the presentation with on-screen text and music.
Benefits: this provides an interesting and engaging approach, and requires the student to think about context and placement of art, not just individual pieces in isolation. Creating themes requires the student to research, compare and contrast different items. Adding music requires the student to think about the emotions aroused by the art and find good juxtaposition. Adding on-screen text as well as narration helps the student learn to present many layers of information at once. If the student is creating a gallery of their own work, this can be posted online.

Art sale
Create a short video persuading the viewer to buy a piece of art. This could be presented in the style of, say, an auction house promotional video, a TV advert, or a segment on a shopping channel. The piece should talk informatively about the piece, its history, the techniques involved and the artist. It should also explain the valuation and make the viewer want to buy it. Students can then vote on each others’ work and pick the most popular.
Benefits: the student has to go into a lot of detail on a single piece, covering both the historical and commercial angles. This is a fun way to present artwork, and allows the students to get slightly tongue in cheek – for example a QVC-style sales pitch for the Mona Lisa, or Sotheby’s trying to sell a drawing by an up and coming young artist, the student themselves. The student also has to be able to show passion for the piece of artwork, and this helps them get interested.


My kids are in what we call "primary school". I have no idea what this is called in other countries, but here it's anything below the college/university level. They are constantly having to learn new programs on various computer platforms just so they can participate in a class whose main topic is not computers. This might be for music, or language arts (which we used to call "English"), history, etc. It would be much easier for them *and* for the teachers if there were canned video lessons teaching how to use these applications (word processors, custom search tools for research, "simple" graphics programs, music software, etc.) so the teachers and students could focus more on the actual core course content.

After seeing Arthur's how-to video where he very cleverly used Moviestorm to show how to do something in Moviestorm, it occurred to me that such an approach is actually very useful for any sort of how-to video.

It was sort of like a screencast on steroids. I'd be willing to bet that schools, teachers, and students would all welcome and benefit videos of this nature.

I'm not sure how to categorize it though. smile.gif

rgr

#8 tombenjamin

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Posted 02 November 2011 - 03:33 AM

Music videos once (& still do) required a whole studio. We can now do it literally from a coffee table. I've now done dozens on my sites tv-tom.com and radio-tom.com as well as two for Moviestorm (see Education movies Banks of the Ohio ). Some of these took a mere couple of hours from the time I thought of doing them to the time they were hosted. Thanks to Moviestorm, YouTube ..etc I'll spend more $ going to karaoke tonight by the time I buy meals & drinks than I did creating this 'international network'.

You might also check out my 'learn to play guitar in 10 minutes' site www.oz-rock.com. It was published via Australian Music Association. It is game-changing as it re-writes the chords to fit the ergonomics. The concept has been around since Orff Schulwerk but I've extended it over to pop music.


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