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#21 aroundworld

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Posted 10 July 2013 - 05:48 PM

ASSIGNMENT #2





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#22 JosephKw

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Posted 11 July 2013 - 05:36 AM

NAME: Mark Redman

Background:German/American, 45 years old, divorced with no children. Born and raised in Alameda, CA. His parents and brother live in southern California, but they rarely get together. Graduated high school, and earned a degree in Library Science from Berkeley. Employed for the past two decades by the Alameda public library. His duties include categorizing books, assisting patrons in locating items, and reading to children two times a week during the "reading is fun" hour. He does not drink, smoke, or gamble, although he does purchase a lottery ticket every week based on the philosophy "you can't win if you don't play."


Goals/ Relationships: Mark dated on and off for decades, but eventually found relationships to be uninteresting (although gossip has it that it is his dates who find him uninteresting). Mark's goal is to simply retire. He just goes on with his daily grind and hopes to retire eventually on his meager pension and social security.


Premise:

It's Halloween, and during one of his "reading is fun" hour sessions, he reads about a haunted mansion in Cheshire, CA. After the reading, an old woman approaches him and says she heard his story and informs him that her uncle was the owner of the Cheshire Mansion before he was murdered. She says she remembered upstairs, in the master chamber's closet, there was a secret passage down to a treasure chamber where he kept his valuables (the uncle was drunk when he showed her). You just had to turn the closet rods towards you three times and the secret door opens. She laughs and walks away with her grandchild in tow.

That Thanksgiving Mark decides to drive down to visit his parents and brother via a road trip, and on the map he notices the town of Cheshire, CA. He takes the detour into Cheshire. He visits the local library and learns the mansion is owned by an old blind man, Mel Ein. Mr. Ein often employs people to read stories for him. Mark decides to apply for the position that weekend, and since he was a library reader for decades, lands the position. He hopes during his gig that he can find an opportunity to visit the upstairs master closet, and turn the rods. This may be his only opportunity for an early retirement.




#23 kkffoo

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Posted 11 July 2013 - 02:52 PM

Constance Mulholland's childhood was chaotic. Characterised by her Mother's endless attempts to find happiness via the next love of her life, each candidate turning out to be more unsuitable than the last
After a particularly nasty 'temporary father' who stole their meagre savings to feed his gambling addiction, Constance and her mother found themselves sleeping rough, and were taken in and cared for by a kindly post woman who had discovered them sleeping in her chicken shed.
She is now a semi-retired post-mistress, working in a small yorkshire market town. She doesn't reveal her age, and no-one dare ask, but the locals guess she has passed the big 60, and she doesn't take the time to quash that assumption.
Ms Mulholland has very few visible interests, and except for her utter devotion to a range of indigo zip up jumpsuits, and an odd prejudice against A6 padded envelopes she seems wholly given to the postal service, almost as if it were a religious order.
Due to her girth to height ratio, her tart way with words, vocal opinions on vegetarianism and the aforementioned fashion fetish, the locals have assigned her the not very affectionate nickname, The Blueberry. Or t'Blueberry in the local patois, not infrequently expanded to 't' bloody blueberry' when the keen administrator points out the errors in her fellow citizens postal affairs.
'T' bloody blueberry told me my stamp wasn't straight.'
This postal devotee spends her off-duty hours within the unadorned walls of a brutalist concrete self-build, in a somewhat ambiguous twosome with the feisty high school resources manager, Jayne Seymour.
Of the two of them, the unfortunate Jayne is least like the famous actress, but Ms Mulholland has already travelled a considerable distance away from that ideal, and is threatening to overtake her bosom buddy at any moment.
Premise:
The town is awarded a community grant, and Constance sees this as her chance to finally create order, and modernise the crumbling buildings in the high street into her dream of 'modern country living'.
Local Lothario, Gordon 'the groper' Braithewaite has other ideas. His scheme centres on reconstructing an ornate baroque market clock tower, and sticking fake tudor beams on the post office.
In order to win over the local populace to his idea, Gordon instigates a combined beauty pageant and pork festival.
When Constance retaliates by organising a lentil fair, which isn't received with enthusiasm, until the rumour goes around that famous actress Jayne Seymour will be judging the soup competition.
Who will win the battle for hearts and minds, and will the real Jayen really appear, who can tell in the crazy world of Hayleigh Butmallerton pop 5000 ?


Goal:
Constance and Jayne lead the opposition campaign, and plan to over turn Braithwaite's seat on the local council in order to turn the town into a meat free zone.
Civil war breaks out as the locals must take sides, and battle for the future of their home and digestion.


#24 aroundworld

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Posted 11 July 2013 - 05:40 PM

BUMP.

There is no try, only do or do not.

 

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#25 aroundworld

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Posted 11 July 2013 - 06:09 PM

QUOTE (kkffoo @ Jul 11 2013, 2:52 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Constance Mulholland is a semi-retired post-mistress, working in a small yorkshire market town. She doesn't reveal her age, and no-one dare ask, but the locals guess she has passed the big 60, and she doesn't take the time to quash that assumption. Ms Mulholland has very few visible interests, and except for her utter devotion to a range of indigo zip up jumpsuits, and an odd prejudice against A6 padded envelopes she seems wholly given to the postal service, almost as if it were a religious order.

Due to her girth to height ratio, her tart way with words, vocal opinions on vegetarianism and the aforementioned fashion fetish, the locals have assigned her the not very affectionate nickname, The Blueberry. Or t'Blueberry in the local patois, not infrequently expanded to 't' bloody blueberry' when the keen administrator points out the errors in her fellow citizens postal affairs.

'T' bloody blueberry told me my stamp wasn't straight.'
This postal devotee spends her off-duty hours within the unadorned walls of a brutalist concrete self-build, in a somewhat ambiguous twosome with the feisty high school resources manager, Jayne Seymour.
Of the two of them, the unfortunate Jayne is least like the famous actress, but Ms Mulholland has already travelled a considerable distance away from that ideal, and is threatening to overtake her bosom buddy at any moment.

HILARIOUS!!! Love this ... However! What can you tell me about her past .. why is she like this? Re-read my example.


Premise:
Local Lothario, Gordon 'the groper' Braithewaite attracts a government grant in order to 'enhance' the local high street, in a bid to entice visitors away from nearby tourist traps, and spend their cash in Hayleigh Butmallerton instead, particularly in his own butcher's shop, which lies directly across the street from the post office.
His scheme centres on reconstructing an ornate baroque market clock tower on the small traffic island which sits mid-way between the two businesses. In order to raise funds he instigates a combined beauty pageant and pork festival.


I don't see Mulholland in your premise! She IS the primary character in your story. This film is about Constance Mulholland. Lothario is a secondary character even though he's the reason Mulholland has a mission.

In The Dark Night, Harvey Dent (Two Face) is a prominent character but the movie is not ultimately about him.
Its about Batman.

Please take another shot at the premise .. include Mulholland... smile.gif



Goal:
Constance and Jayne lead the opposition campaign, and plan to over turn Braithwaite's seat on the local council in order to turn the town into a meat free zone. Civil war breaks out as the locals must take sides, and battle for the future of their home and digestion.

Your goal is excellent! Very funny!


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#26 aroundworld

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Posted 11 July 2013 - 06:28 PM

QUOTE (JosephKw @ Jul 11 2013, 5:36 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
NAME: Mark Redman

Background:German/American, 45 years old, divorced with no children. Born and raised in Alameda, CA. His parents and brother live in southern California, but they rarely get together. Graduated high school, and earned a degree in Library Science from Berkeley. Employed for the past two decades by the Alameda public library. His duties include categorizing books, assisting patrons in locating items, and reading to children two times a week during the "reading is fun" hour. He does not drink, smoke, or gamble, although he does purchase a lottery ticket every week based on the philosophy "you can't win if you don't play."


Good. This is solid, and to the point.



Goals/ Relationships: Mark dated on and off for decades, but eventually found relationships to be uninteresting (although gossip has it that it is his dates who find him uninteresting). Mark's goal is to simply retire. He just goes on with his daily grind and hopes to retire eventually on his meager pension and social security.


Good.


Premise:

It's Halloween, and during one of his "reading is fun" hour sessions, he reads about a haunted mansion in Cheshire, CA. After the reading, an old woman approaches him and says she heard his story and informs him that her uncle was the owner of the Cheshire Mansion before he was murdered. She says she remembered upstairs, in the master chamber's closet, there was a secret passage down to a treasure chamber where he kept his valuables (the uncle was drunk when he showed her). You just had to turn the closet rods towards you three times and the secret door opens. She laughs and walks away with her grandchild in tow.

That Thanksgiving Mark decides to drive down to visit his parents and brother via a road trip, and on the map he notices the town of Cheshire, CA. He takes the detour into Cheshire. He visits the local library and learns the mansion is owned by an old blind man, Mel Ein. Mr. Ein often employs people to read stories for him. Mark decides to apply for the position that weekend, and since he was a library reader for decades, lands the position. He hopes during his gig that he can find an opportunity to visit the upstairs master closet, and turn the rods. This may be his only opportunity for an early retirement.


This is good. Really solid ... You're character sketch, goals and relationships, and premise all cross check with each other. THIS IS IMPORTANT! There is no confusion about what your story is trying to convey. These are a small snapshot of your character's journey and will help you immensely in keeping your stories on track. GOOD JOB.!


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Learn story telling in the MOVIESTORM education forum. 

 

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#27 kkffoo

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Posted 12 July 2013 - 07:21 PM

Constance's childhood was chaotic. Characterised by her Mother's endless attempts to find happiness via the next love of her life, each candidate turning out to be more unsuitable than the last
After a particularly nasty 'temporary father' who stole their meagre savings to feed his gambling addiction, Constance and her mother found themselves sleeping rough, and were taken in and cared for by a kindly post woman who had discovered them sleeping in her chicken shed.

Premise:
The town is awarded a community grant, and Constance sees this as her chance to finally create order, and modernise the crumbling buildings in the high street into her dream of 'modern country living'.
Local Lothario, Gordon 'the groper' Braithewaite has other ideas. His scheme centres on reconstructing an ornate baroque market clock tower, and sticking fake tudor beams on the post office.
In order to win over the local populace to his idea, Gordon instigates a combined beauty pageant and pork festival.
When Constance retaliates by organising a lentil fair, which isn't received with enthusiasm, until the rumour goes around that famous actress Jayne Seymour will be judging the soup competition.
Who will win the battle for hearts and minds, and will the real Jayen really appear, who can tell in the crazy world of Hayleigh Butmallerton pop 5000 ?

#28 aroundworld

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Posted 15 July 2013 - 02:23 AM

QUOTE (kkffoo @ Jul 12 2013, 7:21 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Constance's childhood was chaotic. Characterised by her Mother's endless attempts to find happiness via the next love of her life, each candidate turning out to be more unsuitable than the last
After a particularly nasty 'temporary father' who stole their meagre savings to feed his gambling addiction, Constance and her mother found themselves sleeping rough, and were taken in and cared for by a kindly post woman who had discovered them sleeping in her chicken shed.

Premise:
The town is awarded a community grant, and Constance sees this as her chance to finally create order, and modernise the crumbling buildings in the high street into her dream of 'modern country living'.
Local Lothario, Gordon 'the groper' Braithewaite has other ideas. His scheme centres on reconstructing an ornate baroque market clock tower, and sticking fake tudor beams on the post office.
In order to win over the local populace to his idea, Gordon instigates a combined beauty pageant and pork festival.
When Constance retaliates by organising a lentil fair, which isn't received with enthusiasm, until the rumour goes around that famous actress Jayne Seymour will be judging the soup competition.
Who will win the battle for hearts and minds, and will the real Jayen really appear, who can tell in the crazy world of Hayleigh Butmallerton pop 5000 ?


This is really solid Kate, nice job! Please take this and merge it with the original and you'll have a great character sketch! Thanks so much for taking the time to to do this! smile.gif

Please edit your original and this together.


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#29 kkffoo

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Posted 16 July 2013 - 02:42 PM

Done!

#30 aroundworld

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Posted 16 July 2013 - 09:33 PM

QUOTE (kkffoo @ Jul 11 2013, 2:52 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Constance Mulholland's childhood was chaotic. Characterised by her Mother's endless attempts to find happiness via the next love of her life, each candidate turning out to be more unsuitable than the last. After a particularly nasty 'temporary father' who stole their meagre savings to feed his gambling addiction, Constance and her mother found themselves sleeping rough, and were taken in and cared for by a kindly post woman who had discovered them sleeping in her chicken shed.

She is now a semi-retired post-mistress, working in a small yorkshire market town. She doesn't reveal her age, and no-one dare ask, but the locals guess she has passed the big 60, and she doesn't take the time to quash that assumption. Ms Mulholland has very few visible interests, and except for her utter devotion to a range of indigo zip up jumpsuits, and an odd prejudice against A6 padded envelopes she seems wholly given to the postal service, almost as if it were a religious order.

Due to her girth to height ratio, her tart way with words, vocal opinions on vegetarianism and the aforementioned fashion fetish, the locals have assigned her the not very affectionate nickname, The Blueberry. Or t'Blueberry in the local patois, not infrequently expanded to 't' bloody blueberry' when the keen administrator points out the errors in her fellow citizens postal affairs. 'T' bloody blueberry told me my stamp wasn't straight.'
This postal devotee spends her off-duty hours within the unadorned walls of a brutalist concrete self-build, in a somewhat ambiguous twosome with the feisty high school resources manager, Jayne Seymour.

Of the two of them, the unfortunate Jayne is least like the famous actress, but Ms Mulholland has already travelled a considerable distance away from that ideal, and is threatening to overtake her bosom buddy at any moment.


Premise:
The town is awarded a community grant, and Constance sees this as her chance to finally create order, and modernise the crumbling buildings in the high street into her dream of 'modern country living'.
Local Lothario, Gordon 'the groper' Braithewaite has other ideas. His scheme centres on reconstructing an ornate baroque market clock tower, and sticking fake tudor beams on the post office.
In order to win over the local populace to his idea, Gordon instigates a combined beauty pageant and pork festival.

When Constance retaliates by organising a lentil fair, which isn't received with enthusiasm, until the rumour goes around that famous actress Jayne Seymour will be judging the soup competition.
Who will win the battle for hearts and minds, and will the real Jayen really appear, who can tell in the crazy world of Hayleigh Butmallerton pop 5000?


Goal:
Constance and Jayne lead the opposition campaign, and plan to over turn Braithwaite's seat on the local council in order to turn the town into a meat free zone.
Civil war breaks out as the locals must take sides, and battle for the future of their home and digestion.


There is no try, only do or do not.

 

Learn story telling in the MOVIESTORM education forum. 

 

START HERE:  http://www.moviestor...showtopic=13153


#31 aroundworld

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Posted 18 July 2013 - 03:05 AM

Are there any questions about what we've covered so far?

There is no try, only do or do not.

 

Learn story telling in the MOVIESTORM education forum. 

 

START HERE:  http://www.moviestor...showtopic=13153


#32 aroundworld

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Posted 18 July 2013 - 03:19 AM

Assignment #3




Supporting Characters



In some cases supporting characters have as much impact as the main character in the film. we walk away from the picture thinking, "wow the guy that played the Sheriff in the Big Labowski was amazing!"


Why do we feel this excitement about someone who wasn't a main character in the film? Part of the reason is because they serve a function in revealing another dimension of the main character. Is the supporting character's voice just as important? ABSOLUTELY!



Please give three memorable supporting characters, tell me:


Why they were important to the story.

What made them memorable.

What made their voice clear and distinctive.

How did they help MOVE THE STORY FORWARD.

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#33 JosephKw

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Posted 18 July 2013 - 07:24 AM

Please give three memorable supporting characters:



Newt, from "Aliens"

Why they were important to the story. Newt is the motivation for Ripley's battle against the Aliens.

What made them memorable. Newt is a young girl, whose wits and tenacity allowed her to be the only survivor of the space colony attacked by Aliens.

What made their voice clear and distinctive. Newt, although a young girl, exhibits an air of intelligence, resourcefulness, and perseverance of a much more mature and experienced individual. Yet she still maintains the charm of a young girl, who lost her family and is orphaned. This combination allows her to be loved by both the female and male audiences of the film.

How did they help MOVE THE STORY FORWARD. Newt awoke the maternal instincts of Ripley (who was robbed of her own time with her own daughter due to an unusually long cryosleep). Ripley risks all to protect Newt, who in the end of the film calls her "mommy".



Chewbacca from "Star Wars: A New Hope"

Why they were important to the story. Chewie is the conscience of Han Solo, and his counterpart.

What made them memorable. He's a big shaggy dog-like humanoid who doesn't even speak (well, nothing intelligible).

What made their voice clear and distinctive. Chewie is loyal and courageous and is very much like a devoted dog. Although he can look ferocious, with his huge canines, he also has a gentle side, and even blue eyes (to give him a softer demeanor).

How did they help MOVE THE STORY FORWARD. Chewie is the one who convinced Han Solo to help the rebels when they were overwhelmed by the might of the Empire and threatened to be obliterated by the Death Star.



Samwise Gamgee from "the Lord of the Rings" trilogy

Why they were important to the story. Sam is the motivation and conscience of Frodo (the ring-bearer). Without his support, Frodo would not have been able to complete his quest.

What made them memorable. Sam came from a very modest and mundane background. He was only a gardener. Yet his deeds raised him into the status of a legendary hero.

What made their voice clear and distinctive. Sam's simplicity and, I dare say, naivete, makes him a bigger-than-life role model. He always strives to keep his promises, and is willing to go on when others quit simply because he knows it's the right thing to do. Doing right is his sole motivation.

How did they help MOVE THE STORY FORWARD. Sam is the one who successfully urges Frodo to continue when all hope is lost. In the end, Sam alone continues the quest, even if it meant having to carry his friend Frodo up the slopes of a volcano.




#34 kkffoo

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Posted 18 July 2013 - 04:04 PM

I couldn't remember the plots of any of these films in enough detail to answer the questions fully, but I wanted to choose secondary characters who had an impact on me, in such a way that I remember them when other details about the film have faded.


Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory (original)
Charlie Bucket's Grandad
In the opening scenes he gives the leading character (Charlie) hope to carry on and try again when feeling defeated (no golden ticket). He volunteers to leave his bed and join Charlie when a guardian is needed for the factory tour, and he shares Charlie's wonder at the experience.
I have forgotten the twists and turns of the plot (and I get muddled betwent he two films and the books) but Grandpa Joe, and his relationship with Charlie stick with me, he has an emotional impact.

Bill and ted's Bogus Journey
The character of death.
Again, most of the plot details escape me, but the relationship between Bill and Ted and death endures.
The fun loving pair take a situation which is scary, and find a way to turn it around and make it hilariously funny (they fight for their lives by playing board games with death)
There's a bit of magic in the way that particular scene is done, but as in much comedy it also has (quite hidden) depths. There is something so appealing in the joyful and unexpected way that B &T change the rules of engagement... and the way that the gentlemanly, but somewhat grim character of death responds to their love of life.

Jaws
Captain of the boat
He enters the story late, but becomes the corner of a perfect triangle in a modern take on the tale of Moby Dick. His crusty cynicism, contrasting with the shy scientist, and action orientated cop.
This trio, and the relationships between them is what elevates the movie from a very well done monster movie into something more special.
Their combined fear, their ultimate triumph becomes more meaningful because they come together, despite their differences, to overcome their own fear, and defeat the 'monster'.




#35 aroundworld

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Posted 19 July 2013 - 11:56 PM

QUOTE (JosephKw @ Jul 18 2013, 7:24 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Please give three memorable supporting characters:



Newt, from "Aliens"

Why they were important to the story. Newt is the motivation for Ripley's battle against the Aliens.



What made them memorable. Newt is a young girl, whose wits and tenacity allowed her to be the only survivor of the space colony attacked by Aliens.

What made their voice clear and distinctive. Newt, although a young girl, exhibits an air of intelligence, resourcefulness, and perseverance of a much more mature and experienced individual. Yet she still maintains the charm of a young girl, who lost her family and is orphaned. This combination allows her to be loved by both the female and male audiences of the film.

How did they help MOVE THE STORY FORWARD. Newt awoke the maternal instincts of Ripley (who was robbed of her own time with her own daughter due to an unusually long cryosleep). Ripley risks all to protect Newt, who in the end of the film calls her "mommy".



Chewbacca from "Star Wars: A New Hope"

Why they were important to the story. Chewie is the conscience of Han Solo, and his counterpart.

What made them memorable. He's a big shaggy dog-like humanoid who doesn't even speak (well, nothing intelligible).

What made their voice clear and distinctive. Chewie is loyal and courageous and is very much like a devoted dog. Although he can look ferocious, with his huge canines, he also has a gentle side, and even blue eyes (to give him a softer demeanor).

How did they help MOVE THE STORY FORWARD. Chewie is the one who convinced Han Solo to help the rebels when they were overwhelmed by the might of the Empire and threatened to be obliterated by the Death Star.



Samwise Gamgee from "the Lord of the Rings" trilogy

Why they were important to the story. Sam is the motivation and conscience of Frodo (the ring-bearer). Without his support, Frodo would not have been able to complete his quest.

What made them memorable. Sam came from a very modest and mundane background. He was only a gardener. Yet his deeds raised him into the status of a legendary hero.

What made their voice clear and distinctive. Sam's simplicity and, I dare say, naivete, makes him a bigger-than-life role model. He always strives to keep his promises, and is willing to go on when others quit simply because he knows it's the right thing to do. Doing right is his sole motivation.

How did they help MOVE THE STORY FORWARD. Sam is the one who successfully urges Frodo to continue when all hope is lost. In the end, Sam alone continues the quest, even if it meant having to carry his friend Frodo up the slopes of a volcano.

FANTASTIC! There really isn't much to say here, you really nailed this assignment... please make notes of this! Apply these to your own work in the future. Excellent!

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#36 aroundworld

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Posted 20 July 2013 - 12:28 AM

QUOTE (kkffoo @ Jul 18 2013, 4:04 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I couldn't remember the plots of any of these films in enough detail to answer the questions fully, but I wanted to choose secondary characters who had an impact on me, in such a way that I remember them when other details about the film have faded.


The above statement is so important Kate. They IMPACTED YOU! Something in there VOICE made you LISTEN, WATCH, REMEMBER.


Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory (original)
Charlie Bucket's Grandad

In the opening scenes he gives the leading character (Charlie) hope to carry on and try again when feeling defeated (no golden ticket). He volunteers to leave his bed and join Charlie when a guardian is needed for the factory tour, and he shares Charlie's wonder at the experience.

I have forgotten the twists and turns of the plot (and I get muddled betwent he two films and the books) but Grandpa Joe, and his relationship with Charlie stick with me, he has an emotional impact.


You absorbed some of that nurturing from the film, didn't you? YES! Absolutely ... This was a stellar supporting character. Touching the heart with what every child, even adult will respond to on some level. Why? because nurturing validates us.. it makes us feel valued, and that carried over form the film to you, giving you that emotional impact.


Bill and ted's Bogus Journey

The character of death.
Again, most of the plot details escape me, but the relationship between Bill and Ted and death endures.
The fun loving pair take a situation which is scary, and find a way to turn it around and make it hilariously funny (they fight for their lives by playing board games with death)
There's a bit of magic in the way that particular scene is done, but as in much comedy it also has (quite hidden) depths. There is something so appealing in the joyful and unexpected way that B &T change the rules of engagement... and the way that the gentlemanly, but somewhat grim character of death responds to their love of life.

YES! Who wouldn't want to cheat death or even change his mind about coming for us. Even make him appreciate life!



Jaws
Captain of the boat: Robert Shaw

He enters the story late, but becomes the corner of a perfect triangle in a modern take on the tale of Moby Dick. His crusty cynicism, contrasting with the shy scientist (Richard Dreyfuss), and action orientated cop (Roy Scheider).

This trio, and the relationships between them is what elevates the movie from a very well done monster movie into something more special.
Their combined fear, their ultimate triumph becomes more meaningful because they come together, despite their differences, to overcome their own fear, and defeat the 'monster'.

YES! Excellent observation! The boat captain highlighted the other characters beautifully and even forced from them something both of them didn't know they had!

This IS the role of supporting characters .. they force from OR highlight something from the hero that needs to surface in order to make them more vivid. In doing so, the supporting character may become more visible themselves .. hopefully in away that supports the story.


As we all know, in the case if Harrison Ford in Star Wars, his character Hans Solo, originally and supporting role became the central character. Why? We, the audience choose him! Why did we do that? Personally it's because we related to his struggle to make ends meet. He was trying to make a living ... a blue collar smuggler just trying to get by.

We understood "Joe six pack" and a disdain for upper crust authority more readily than say .. a Kidd that wanted to be a Jedi Knight! Whats a Jedi knight?



Once again, insightful observations bringing out another side of the subject matter that is integral to the lesson. THANK YOU!

Excellent!

Remember this for your own work in the future.

There is no try, only do or do not.

 

Learn story telling in the MOVIESTORM education forum. 

 

START HERE:  http://www.moviestor...showtopic=13153


#37 aroundworld

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Posted 22 July 2013 - 09:46 PM

ASSIGNMENT #4




Write a supporting character. It can be from your main character exorcize, HOWEVER, I want to know:


1. How will the supporting character bring out hidden qualities of the main character?

2. Give me only three things about their back ground that makes them qualified to support the main character. These could be opposite qualities that cause the main character to rise to the occasion.

3. Tell me what they will do for the main character that will make them (supporting character) memorable.

4. Tell me Where in the film you would introduce them and why.

There is no try, only do or do not.

 

Learn story telling in the MOVIESTORM education forum. 

 

START HERE:  http://www.moviestor...showtopic=13153


#38 aroundworld

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Posted 24 July 2013 - 02:53 AM

BUMP

There is no try, only do or do not.

 

Learn story telling in the MOVIESTORM education forum. 

 

START HERE:  http://www.moviestor...showtopic=13153


#39 kkffoo

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Posted 24 July 2013 - 03:02 PM

Will get to this ASAP, thanks.

#40 JosephKw

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Posted 25 July 2013 - 10:31 AM

Supporting Character nicknamed "Average Joe". He is the sidekick to superhero "Avenging Joe" (a human from another dimension)

1. How will the supporting character bring out hidden qualities of the main character?
Superhero "AJ" behaves like a stereotypical ideal superhero who behaves larger than life and rigidly adheres to a chivalrous code of conduct. His sidekick, "Average Joe" has no superpowers whatsoever, but tries to do what a superhero sidekick should, and thus fails miserably (due to his lack of any powers or talents). This forces Superhero "AJ" to come down to earth to nurture his mundane companion and provides us with glimpses of the human in this superhuman.

2. Give me only three things about their back ground that makes them qualified to support the main character. These could be opposite qualities that cause the main character to rise to the occasion.
One, "Average Joe" has none of the superpowers that superhero "AJ" has, except for his courage and will of steel. This trait earns him the respect of "AJ" since it makes "Average Joe" braver than the superhero himself.
Two, "Average Joe" is unemployed and with limited education. "AJ" has unlimited finds and a superior intellect. Yet on many occasions it is "Average Joe's" street-wise knowledge which enables the superhero to complete his missions.
Three, "Average Joe" has faults like the average person does, and superhero "AJ" finds that by studying and learning from "Average Joe", he can better understand and out-think his opponents. However, it is "Average Joe's" faults which also teach the super "AJ" about empathy, compassion and leniency.

3. Tell me what they will do for the main character that will make them (supporting character) memorable. Actually, my answers to the above apply here as well (the average enhancing the "perfect").

4. Tell me Where in the film you would introduce them and why. The opening scene, right after introducing the superhero "AJ" so that they mirror each other's actions, with the difference being "AJ"'s actions are super, while "Average Joe's" are unremarkable. Here's how the introduction looks like: the film starts with a crime in progress. As the culprits are about to escape on the streets, superhero "Avenging Joe" jumps down from a five story building to block their path. As one of the criminals aims his gun at him, "AJ" kicks a garbage can to send it flying into the perp, taking him out. His accomplice runs into an alley only to confront..."Average Joe", who jumps down from a trash bin. The accomplice pulls out a knife, and "Average Joe" kicks an aluminum can into his stomach. Nothing happens. Before the knife-wielding punk can attack, "AJ" gives him the drop.


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