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Image sequence frame rate question.


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#1 Koefoed

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Posted 18 April 2008 - 06:15 AM

Hey guys.

Can someone please help me with this? I prefer to capture videos using the method of image sequence for post production, rather then compressing into a video format in Moviestorm. The only question I have is how I can go about changing the frame rate for doing this. For instance, by default it is approximately 25 FPS, and I would like to be able to capture anywhere from 30 to 60 FPS.

Is this something I can alter in a command line in one of the files, or is there some detail I simply over looked in the capture options?

Thanks.

#2 equinoxx

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Posted 18 April 2008 - 08:14 AM

Currently, frame rate is hard-coded at 25fps. It's only been in the last couple of builds that we've gotten options beyond the default renderer and image sequence. Hope springs eternal that we'll get frame rate control somewhere down the line.
David "equinoxx" Anderson
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#3 twak

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Posted 18 April 2008 - 09:30 AM

Yes, we do need this. I'll put in a feature request & have a quick hack this morning to see how long it'll take.

Why, oh why is the ntsc-m (the american tv standard) 29.97fps? "I know we'll choose a nice round number that's easy for everyone to remember - how about 30? no? 29? ok we'll split the difference and call it 29 point something and take the rest of the afternoon off". I'm sure it's something to do with physics, but I've got no idea why.
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#4 Spong3y

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Posted 18 April 2008 - 09:37 AM

Right now everything seems to be rendered into 25fps PAL by Moviestorm by default. It's because Moviestorm was developed in Europe and Europe uses PAL as a standard.

I'd love to have the ability change the framerates. Trying to experiment with higher frame rates - 50fps and higher.
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#5 twak

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Posted 18 April 2008 - 10:32 AM

i've put this in (won't be in the next release, but probably 1.5).
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#6 Synnah

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Posted 24 April 2008 - 12:53 PM

I've just checked this out, and things really do look amazing when rendered at 60fps! Also, if you're working with image seqences, you can render at up to 100fps, and play the sequence back at a lower speed, for slow motion!
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Short Fuze QA bloke

#7 Spong3y

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Posted 24 April 2008 - 01:26 PM

(Synnah)
I've just checked this out, and things really do look amazing when rendered at 60fps! Also, if you're working with image seqences, you can render at up to 100fps, and play the sequence back at a lower speed, for slow motion!


Yes, Synnah, that's what I was looking for. Rendering in frame rates higher than 60fps surely makes the animation smooth. Also, it looks good when you slow it down in post-production. You won't get those choppy video frames but instead you get that smooth slow mo you see on films like Matrix

I've use this technique in The Sims 2 and Antics, hope I can also use high FPS for Moviestorm.
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#8 twak

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Posted 24 April 2008 - 01:35 PM

Slow motion is a great idea, perhaps we need a 200fps options?...
-- twak

#9 equinoxx

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Posted 24 April 2008 - 06:05 PM

In-engine over-cranking (and under-cranking, for that matter) would be a fabulous feature to have.

Oh, by the way:
("twak")
Why, oh why is the ntsc-m (the american tv standard) 29.97fps? "I know we'll choose a nice round number that's easy for everyone to remember - how about 30? no? 29? ok we'll split the difference and call it 29 point something and take the rest of the afternoon off". I'm sure it's something to do with physics, but I've got no idea why.


("wikipedia")
The NTSC field refresh frequency was originally exactly 60 Hz in the black-and-white system, chosen because it matched the nominal 60 Hz frequency of alternating current power used in the United States. Matching the field refresh rate to the power source avoided wave interference which produces rolling bars on the screen. Synchronization of the refresh rate to the power incidentally helped kinescope cameras record early live television broadcasts, as it was very simple to synchronize a film camera to capture one frame of video on each film frame by using the alternating current frequency as a shutter trigger.

In the color system the refresh frequency was shifted slightly downward to 59.94 Hz to eliminate stationary dot patterns in the color carrier...

David "equinoxx" Anderson
http://www.veoh.com/...els/equinoxxent

#10 Spong3y

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Posted 25 April 2008 - 01:25 AM

(twak)
Slow motion is a great idea, perhaps we need a 200fps options?...


I never ran my PC at that speed with any program (ZOMG! I only reach 120fps), but that would be useful for people there with powerful graphics cards.
[witty signature pending]

#11 saument

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Posted 25 April 2008 - 02:42 AM

(equinoxx)
In-engine over-cranking (and under-cranking, for that matter) would be a fabulous feature to have.


Especially if it's keyframable!
=================================
Stephen Aument
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#12 DavidB

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Posted 25 April 2008 - 09:11 PM

now, you see, you've gone and got the code-monkeys all jabbering and excited again.

throw them a banana and hope they get back to the work in hand.

mmmmm - smooth ultra-slo mo bullet time that is greenscreened into live action.

sorry, where was I.?
David J W Bailey ACA MA MSc GIBiol MInstD

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